editor@southboroughnews.com

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Archived Page 48

April 6, 2008  to  April 12, 2008

Dog Day Afternoon

April 12, 2008 - April means it's time to get your shots.  Dogs and cats gathered at the Southborough DPW this afternoon to get their rabies shots.  While there, owners were able to pick up information from the Southborough Animal Disaster Preparedness Committee on how to put a pet disaster kit together and what to do if an emergency should arise in town.  A Pet disaster backpack and what to pack in it was on display also.  For more information on how to prepare your pet if you need to evacuate in an emergency due to storms, hazardous conditions or chemical leaks check www.southboroughanimaldisasterpreparedness.org

But Cats were Welcome too

April 12, 2008 - All done.  This cat is finished with getting it's rabies shot for the year.

All about Birds

April 12, 2008 - Local Author and Illustrator Gordon Morrison presents one of his drawings of an Eagle to the crowd of youngsters, moms and dads this morning.  Earlier Gordon read one of his books and then talked about how he researches for his books and drawings by walking through the woods and watching and listening to the wildlife.

        

Angry Skies

April 12, 2008 - The Salt building shows up brighter than bright with the dark angry thunderstorm clouds scuttling in the background.  Southborough Fire Department was called later in the day to a possible lightening strike to a transformer with wires down across from Falconi oil.  Route 30/Boston Road is temporarily re-routed near the fallen wires until National Grid arrives and repairs the damage.

Turkey Vulture

April 12, 2008 - A Turkey Vulture flies just over the trees near the Sudbury River.

ARHS Sports Schedule 4/12/08

Boys

Varsity

Lacrosse

@

**Postponed - Hingham High School

 

3:00PM

 

 Boys

JV

Lacrosse

@

**Postponed - Hingham High School

 

3:00PM

 

 Girls

Varsity

Lacrosse

@

Acton-Boxborough Regional HS

 

5:30PM

 

 Girls

JV

Lacrosse

@

Acton-Boxborough Regional HS

 

7:00PM

AVRTHS Sports Schedule 4/9/08

no events scheduled

Golf Season

April 11, 2008 - Golfers head for the green at St. Mark's Golf course earlier this week.

Cobra in a Box

April 11, 2008 - Students from the Woodward School display their animal habitats earlier this week.

April 11, 2008 It's a big weekend around town

10:30 AM Southborough Library meet local Author Gordon Morrison as he signs his new book "Nature in the Neighborhood".

2:00 PM Rabies Clinic, DPW Garage.  Cats (must be crated) 2 - 3:00 PM, Dogs on leash 3 - 4:00 PM,  $10.00 per animal.

6:00 - 10:00 PM St. Anne's and St. Matthew's youth ministry Dinner, Dance, silent auction and raffle.  St. Anne's Hall. $10.00 per person or $40.00 for a family.

7:30 PM Steeple Coffeehouse presents Antje Duvekot $15.00 at the door.

8:00 PM Algonquin Regional High School Thoroughly Modern Millie Musical.  Will also be presented Sunday April 13 at 2:00 PM.

Skunked

April 11, 2008 - Skunk cabbage begins to sprout in the Sudbury River Swamp.  If the leaves were to be broken the plant gives off the odor that gives it the name Skunk Cabbage.

 

RABIES CLINIC

FOR CATS AND DOGS


 

SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2008

THE SOUTHBOROUGH BOARD OF HEALTH

IS SPONSORING

DR. SHARON WESTPHAL

OF

SOUTHBOROUGH

VETERINARY HOSPITAL

TO ADMINISTER VACCINES

AT OUR ANNUAL RABIES CLINIC

the clinic will be held at

THE DPW BUILDING , 147 CORDAVILLE RD.

COST:   $10.00/ANIMAL

HOURS FOR CATS: 2:00 - 3:00

HOURS FOR DOGS: 3:00 - 4:00

DOGS MUST BE LEASHED

CATS MUST BE IN A CARRIER

{WITH PROOF OF A VALID 2007 VACCINATION CERTIFICATE THESE VACCINATIONS MAY BE GOOD FOR 3 YEARS, ALL OTHER VACCINATIONS ARE GOOD FOR ONLY 1 YEAR}

Town House in bloom

April 10, 2008 - Vanessa Hale stands next to a table-ful of pansies to show our support for Chief Bill Webber, 30 Town employees bought 140 pansy plants to raise $570 to support pancreatic cancer research for the Pancreatic Cancer Alliance, an organization affiliated with UMass Medical Center (http://www.pancreaticalliance.org/).  We were only too happy to participate in the Pansies for Progress effort, as organized here in Southborough by Vanessa Hale, Assistant Town Administrator.

Playing on a level field

April 10, 2008 - Town facilities employees level the infield at Choate Field yesterday.

Food Pantry Donation

April 10, 2008 - Members of the Woodville Trailbusters 4H Horse Club show off the donated items their club donated to the Southborough Food Pantry.  Each month the club donates items to a food pantry in a member's local town.  Items have been donated to Holliston, Hopkinton, Westborough and Southborough.  If you would like to donate food or cleaning items, the Southborough Food Pantry is located at Pilgrim Church in town.  Many of Southborough's churches collect for the food pantry.

Animal Habitat Day

April 9, 2008 - Woodward School students participated in the annual wildlife Habitat study and display.  Above is the Skunk, Grizzly Bear and Giraffe habitats.  Below are the White Wolves.

 

Out of the fog

April 9, 2008 - CSX engine #4714 rolls eastbound on the CSX tracks.

Southborough Garden Club Scholarship

The Southborough Garden Club has established a scholarship to be awarded to a student who has been accepted to a school of higher education or is presently attending college in one of the following fields: Arts, and/or Sciences as related to Horticulture, Floral Design, Environmental Studies, Ecology, Conservation, Agriculture, Botany, or Landscape Architecture/Design.

 

To be eligible, the candidate must be a two year resident of Southborough and must demonstrate scholastic achievement and good citizenship. The Amount of the award this year is $1,000.

 

Applications are available at the Southborough Public Library and should be returned by April 21st to the address below.

 

Marjorie Lowry, Scholarship Chair

Southborough Garden Club

35 Glen Court   

Southborough, MA  01772

Northborough Road Crash

April 9, 2008 - Firefighters work on a vehicle that had left the road, hit trees, rolled over and landed on upright on the four tires.  The driver was transported to the hospital with non-life-threatening injuries in the 2:35 AM Saturday morning crash on Northboro Road.

Fire Log

Monday 4/7/08

08:44 EMS CALL,EXCLUDE VEH ACC W/INJ CORDAVILLE RD
A28 FF NEAL FF ROACH
C30 LT DANO

11:00 PLAN REVIEW MEETING MARLBORO RD
C20 CHIEF MAURO
C27 CAPT MAURO

11:34 EMS CALL,EXCLUDE VEH ACC W/INJ RICHARDS RD
A28 FF NEAL LT DANO
C30 FF ROACH

12:22 EMS CALL,EXCLUDE VEH ACC W/INJ WARD RD
A29 FF ROACH FF FRANKS
C27 CAPT MAURO
WESTBORO AMBULANCE

13:12 EMS CALL,EXCLUDE VEH ACC W/INJ PINECONE LN
A28 FF ROACH FF NEAL
C30 LT DANO

15:30 OIL BURNER ALEXANDRA CR
C27 CAPT MAURO

Sunday 4/6/08

02:03 EMS CALL,EXCLUDE VEH ACC W/INJ TURNPIKE RD
A28 FF AMENDOLA FF ALESSI
C30 FF HOGAN

06:50 SPRINKLER ACT. DUE TO MALFUNC. CORDAVILLE RD
E22 LT PELTIER FF FRANKS FF HOGAN
E23 FF AMENDOLA FF ALESSI

07:30 EMS CALL,EXCLUDE VEH ACC W/INJ MAIN ST
A28 FF AMENDOLA FF ALESSI

09:42 PUBLIC SERVICE ASSISTANCE, OTH CORDAVILLE RD
C30 FF CRINGAN

12:00 TRAINING - FIRE
HQ4 EMT GLECKEL FF ASPESI FF SHANAHAN FF WILLS

12:20 TRAINING - FIRE MAIN ST
HQ4 EMT GLECKEL FF ASPESI FF SHANAHAN FF WILLS

21:06 EMS CALL,EXCLUDE VEH ACC W/INJ MAIN ST
A28 FF WILLS FF SHANAHAN
C30 FF ASPESI  More Fire Log

Community Preservation Funding

April 9, 2008 - At this year's Annual Town Meeting there will be several warrant articles dealing with a variety of projects that have been presented to the Community Preservation Committee and then recommended to the Selectmen to be included in the Warrant.  CPA money in Southborough comes from a one percent surcharge of the real estate tax that then goes into a special fund and is  matched by the state to do projects that might otherwise not get funded through the regular channels.  By State Law a certain percentage of the funds are earmarked for historical, open space, recreation and housing.  Last year Town meeting funded Phase one to have restoration and microfilming of Town records, Historical Museum renovations, renovate the All-wars memorial, pay an installment of the bond for the Chestnut Hill land, put money into the Housing fund and begin an oral history project. 

This year projects range from $50,000 to seed the Stony Brook Museum construction, another Chestnut Hill Farm installment payment, more money to the housing fund, restoration on South Union School (art center), application for the South Union school to be put on the register of Historic places and to fund the MBTA triangle at River Street, Southville and Cordaville Roads.  More information on the Community Preservation Act and committee click here.

Sirens to be tested

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR FIRE STATION NEIGHBORS

April 3, 2008

Dear Local Resident:

As you are aware, the alerting air horns at Fire Headquarters have been silent for a few years. The technology for alerting off-duty and on-call personnel is outdated and no longer effective.

There is however a need to notify the residents of Southborough to be alerted to impending emergencies and disasters. Such emergencies and/or disasters include, but are not limited to: tornado warning (when a tornado is actually spotted and Southborough is in its path), a hazardous materials release which could require evacuation or sheltering in place, and/or similar situations. The air horns at Fire Headquarters are the least expensive option to notify residents to turn to a particular media outlet to receive instructions. Judging by past events, the usage of the horns would be extremely minimal, however extremely useful when needed.

In order to ensure that the system is still operational, the Department plans on conducting a test of the horns. The test dates are April 14, 2008, with a back-up of April 16, 2008 in the event the system does not work properly the first try. The testing should be conducted between the hours of 10:00 AM and 2:00 PM to minimize any convenience to residents.

Should you have any questions, please feel free to contact me.

Very Truly Yours,

John D. Mauro, Jr.,

Fire Chief/Emergency Management Director

 

St. Mark's School, Southborough Summer Singing Program

Summer Singing at St. Mark’s School in Southborough is back for its third year so come and be a part of the fun! Two programs are being offered this summer: Sing, Act & More! for ages 11-13 and Singers Can Act! for ages 14 and up. Aspiring young performers will be directed by New York University faculty member, Martha Collins with assistance from Walnut Hill pianist and coach, Elaine Smith Purcell and Juilliard voice graduate, Debra Parker. Under their guidance, students will learn to sing, act and dance with confidence and flair! Both courses will run from July 28-August 8 with a final performance on Friday, August 8, 7:00 pm in the beautiful new Center for the Arts.

Sing, Act & More! is for singers aged 11-13 as of August 1, 2008. This class will run from Monday-Friday, 9-12:30 pm. Participants will take part in group drama games, singing classes, dance and movement. No auditions are required for this program and anyone who is keen and enthusiastic will have a fabulous time preparing for the fully staged, final concert.

Singers Can Act! is limited to 14 participants aged 14 and above. This class will run from Monday–Friday, 10:30-4pm. These young singers will have both group and individual dramatic and musical coaching by our outstanding faculty. Singers will also take group movement and dance and will be featured in solos or small ensembles in the final concert. Anyone interested should contact Debra Parker to schedule an audition.

All information including faculty biographies and application forms are available by visiting the St. Mark’s School website: www.stmarksschool.org/summermusic  Any questions may be directed to program coordinator, Debra Parker, at 508-786-6305 or debraparker@stmarksschool.org

Summer Chamber Music Festival Concerts

Wednesday, July 9: 7 pm Opening Concert Class of 1945 Hall

Sunday, July 20: 7:30 pm Tabernacle, Craigville Conference Center, 251 Lake Elizabeth Drive, Centerville, MA (Cape Cod)

Saturday, July 26: 7 pm Chamber Music Festival Closing Concert Class of 1945 Hall

Additional Concerts will be announced for the Chamber Music Festival on this site during the Festival.

Summer Vocal Music Concert Friday, August 8: 7pm Closing Performance Sing, Act and More! and Singers Can Act!

All concerts are free and open to the public. Parking is available adjacent to the Center for the Arts. The Center for the Arts is handicapped accessible.

The International Chamber Music Festival and Institute features private lessons, chamber music coaching, orchestra, master classes and a series of faculty and student concerts, July 7-26. Master teachers from Boston, New York and Moscow will serve as the faculty for the Festival and Institute.

For further information, about the chamber music program, please contact Festival Director, Ellina Blinder, 508-786-6309 or ellinablinder@stmarksschool.org.

St. Mark’s School is located at 25 Marlborough Road, Southborough, MA  01772.

Arts Center at Southborough Newsletter
April 2008
 
Arts Center Logo
 
 
In This Issue
February Art Camp
Rosalita's Puppets
Gordon Morrison
Administrative Details
Classes & Workshops
New Email
Photographers Wanted
Quick Links
Join Our Mailing List
  April Vacation Art Camp!
 
Children taking art class
April 22, 23, 24
AM 10-12
 PM 12:30-2:30

Fee for members: $70/class

Click Here for the pdf with class descriptions and registration form
 
Greetings -
 
Welcome to the Arts Center's e-newsletter! In this issue, you'll find links to all sorts of great happenings in and around Southborough.

In an attempt to reach more folks, we'd appreciate it if you would forward this email (using the constant contact forward link at the bottom) to anyone who might be interested in what we have to offer. We will respect email addresses and will never give them out to other organizations.

We welcome any and all feedback and would love to hear from you.  We're looking for fresh ideas and hope to see you at one of our classes or events!

Thank you -
Emily van Nort
Interim Director, Arts Center at Southborough
 
 
Gordon Morrison, Saturday April 12th
10:30am at Southborough Library

Join us for a talk and signing by author/illustrator Gordon Morrison. He has teamed up with the Mary E. Finn school to bring conservation and awareness to the kids. For a recent article from the MetroWest Daily News click here.

 
Drop of Water Book Cover

Author  and illustrator Gordon Morrison has captured a single moment in time, revealing the course and influence of water, and inviting readers to pause and consider the world around them in this beautiful and lyrical appreciation of nature and the resource that makes it all possible - a drop of water.

 
Administrative Tidbits
 
Deadlines:
 
Ann Freeman drawing of the Arts CenterApril Art Camp - April 11th
 
Session III - April 18th

 
Read our annual report here

Membership! We appreciate those of you who continue to give. If you'd like to join today, click here.
 

 
 
Classes & Workshops
Session III starts April 28th with another 6 weeks of classes. If you haven't gotten around to taking a class don't miss our last session before our summer break.

Click here for a quick pdf version of all of our offerings or check out our web site for the schedule.

Highlights:
 
Rosalita's Puppets, April 5th
Gordon Morrison at the Library, April 12th

 
 
New Email!
Arts Building Warhol StyleWe have re-vamped our web site and with that comes a new email addresses. We have transitioned to: 
 
info@southborougharts.org
director@southborougharts.org
 
One more way to bring you more information in a quicker way than before. 
 
Classic Photographers Wanted
 
We are looking for a few passionate people to participate an open studio and use our beautiful dark room space. Some experience would be great, but even the novice can jump in and learn the art of developing their own film.

Please email if you are interested, and we'll get the ball rolling!
 
 
Thank you for your support. If you have any questions, concerns or would like to register. Please contact me - email is best.
 
Sincerely,
Emily van Nort
director@southborougharts.org
508 481 9351
 

ARHS Sports Schedule 4/9/08

Boys

Varsity

Tennis

VS

Leominster High School

Algonquin

3:30PM

 

 Girls

Varsity

Tennis

VS

Leominster High School

Algonquin

3:30PM

 

 Boys

Varsity

Baseball

@

Quabbin Regional H.S.

 

4:00PM

 

 Boys

JV

Baseball

VS

Quabbin Regional H.S.

Algonquin

4:00PM

 

 Girls

Varsity

Softball

@

Quabbin Regional H.S.

 

4:00PM

 

 Girls

JV

Softball

VS

Quabbin Regional H.S.

Algonquin

4:00

AVRTHS Sports Schedule 4/9/08

Boys

Varsity

Lacrosse

VS

Lynn Technical Highschool

 

3:30PM

 

 Boys

Varsity

Baseball

VS

Nashoba Valley Techhs

 

3:30PM

 

 Girls

Varsity

Softball

VS

Nashoba Valley Techhs

Softball Field

3:30PM

 

 Girls

JV

Softball

@

**Postponed - Nashoba Valley Techhs Click for directions

 

3:30PM

 

 Boys

JV

Baseball

@

**Postponed - Nashoba Valley Techhs Click for directions

 

3:30PM

It's trying Hard to Get Warmer

April 9, 2008 - Red buds attempt to break out as the temperatures try to break out.

Spring is Blooming

April 8, 2008 - Spring is beginning to bloom.  Daffodils and Crocus are beginning to pop out of the ground, buds are breaking and at Gulbankian Farms Garden Center and Florist Shop you can find hundreds of beautiful pansies.

Trottier Career Day

April 8, 2008 - Students at the Trottier Middle School were able to experience a variety of dozens of careers that included computer technology, firefighting, police officer, chefs, Puppeteer, Business CEO's and including the Southborough News.

     

Hundreds Go to State House to Tell Their Legislators

‘MA needs an Environmental Bond Now’

 

(Boston) Hundreds of people from across the Commonwealth went to the State House earlier this week telling their legislators of the local need to pass the Environmental Bond Bill this session.  The event, put together by the Coalition for the Environmental Bond, included people from the more than 250 member organizations, municipal groups, sports & recreation organizations and businesses.

 

"The Environmental Bond Bill provides funding for essential efforts such as natural area protection, park and beach restoration, water quality protection, and support of working farms," said Andrew J. Falender, Executive Director of the Appalachian Mountain Club. "The strong support for this bill from 250 organizations and people all over the Commonwealth reflects the importance of conservation and recreation funding to communities across Massachusetts, and the urgent need for this legislative session to take action."

 

“The turnout today represents the breadth, strength and concern communities statewide share that the environmental bond pass this session,” said Jack Clarke, Director of Public Policy and Government Relations for Mass Audubon. “Simply stated, we need this Environmental Bond Bill now – for water quality, dam safety, climate impact changes and land protection opportunities that may soon be lost forever.”

 

Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Ian Bowles, Senators Resor and Brewer as well as Representative Smizik addressed the crowd before they went, en masse, to the State House.

 

“The environmental bond bill is vital to protecting natural resources across the Commonwealth including parks, beaches, and bike trails,” said Sen. Resor. “In the long-run, such investments pay for themselves through improved job growth and tourism revenue. This bond bill is an important 5-year commitment to maintaining and improving environmental safety initiatives such as repairing dams, safeguarding drinking water, and reducing pollution.”

 

"This bond bill is the fuel that runs the engine for our environmental programs. Its successful passage will preserve our natural resources for our children and our grandchildren," said Senator Brewer.

 

Representative Smizik, co-chair of the Joint Committee on Environment, Natural Resources and Agriculture told the crowd that “This document, our first full bond in six years, sets the stage for our environmental work over the next half-decade. The bond is comprehensive, is generous in its bottom line, and puts us back on track after years of neglect. I’m particularly pleased to include authorization for subjects like climate change adaptation, land preservation, dam removal, and water supply protection.”

 

Members of the Coalition told their legislators of the importance of the environmental bond to their local communities and asked their elected officials to pass the bond this session because the health and safety issues the bond addresses simply cannot wait.

 

Funds from the 2002 Environmental Bond have been largely used up, and many important programs are running out of money, putting our environment, health and safety at risk. Without a new Environmental Bond, many environmental programs will face major cuts that affect our communities, outdoor recreational activities, the state’s $14.2 billion tourism industry and natural resources.

 

"The longer we delay passing the Environmental Bond bill, the greater the risk, not only to our environment, but to our economy,” said George Bachrach, President of the Environmental League of Massachusetts. Tourism is a $14.2 billion industry, largely driven by the quality of our environment. And CEO's make decisions daily as to where to expand or relocate their businesses, often driven by quality of life issues as to where they and their workforce want to live. Massachusetts needs to move quickly not to lose this important edge."

 

Below are some of the most important reasons the Legislature must pass the Environmental Bond Bill before the session ends July 31.

 

LAND PROTECTION:

The Commonwealth continues to lose 40 acres of open space a day to development. The Environmental Bond’s historic level of funding, proposed $50 million per year, will help protect land from unwise development for this and future generations of Bay State residents and visitors.

 

Without the state funds, communities will be powerless in the face of development pressures, and many important landscapes will be lost. Without a new bond, state agencies will no longer be able to acquire ecologically important land or provide grants to communities trying to protect their last, special places. While many land protection projects include local, federal, and private funding as well, many of these sources depend upon a state contribution. 

 

From a fiscal planning and efficiency perspective, a "down" real estate market is the best time for state land conservation. Many important properties come on the market due to increased relative burden of carrying costs, and very favorable terms may be negotiated now.

 

COMMUNITIES:

Traditional fishing ports such as New Bedford and Gloucester will receive badly needed funding for infrastructure support because the Seaport Bond has been integrated into the Environmental Bond.

 

Protecting open space reduces the costs associated with water treatment. According to a study by the Trust for Public Land and the American Waterworks Association, every 10 percent increase in forest cover reduces the costs of water treatment decrease by approximately 20 percent.

 

Cities and towns must reduce the enormous backlog of capital improvements for local water supply, wastewater and storm water infrastructure projects, particularly to leverage matching funds to help cities and towns protect their water supply areas.

 

Lakes and ponds statewide are facing an increasing invasion of non-native species, threatening native species, habitats and lake front property values. Each year we delay these projects, the damage to property and our tourist economy increases.

 

FARMS:

Funding for farmland protection gives farmers an important alternative to selling their land for development, and helps prevent the loss of dozens of working farms, thousands of acres of watershed protection areas, working woodlands and wildlife habitat.

 

The bond will continue to support our family farms in providing high quality, locally grown food that keeps our families healthy, reduces the environmental impacts of importing food and keeps farmers in business. The growth in farm stands and farmers markets has made Massachusetts #1 nationwide in direct sales per farm to consumers.

 

PUBLIC SAFETY:

Bond funding will enable the state to clean up and reuse of some of the 6,000 brownfield sites across the state. Cleaning up these sites will reduce public health risks and provide additional business development sites that can help build local economies.

 

The bond will enable the state to implement watershed assessments as required by the federal Clean Water Act, to determine if they meet water quality standards. Twenty percent of our watersheds have still not been assessed at all and many others have not been fully assessed.

 

The bond bill would allow dam inspection, repair and removal to avoid problems like the collapse of the Whittenton Dam in Taunton. Climate change impacts such as more intense storms and flooding increase the risks associated with unsafe dams.

 

PARKS AND ECONOMY:

The bond is critical to begin reducing the $1.7 billion park maintenance backlog, to prevent more buildings, campsites and trails from falling into disrepair, to prevent more seawalls from dissolving into the ocean, and more park bathrooms from closing for lack of upkeep. This has a dramatic affect on our tourist industry as visitors choose whether to return to Massachusetts for their next vacation.

 

The bond funds vital seasonal work, such as transportation, construction, rehabilitation and other work at our parks, harbor islands and seashores, which can only be done during warm weather.  Delaying the passage of the bill costs for this work will rise while the quality and safety of these state assets deteriorates.

 

GLOBAL WARMING

The bond allows the environmental agencies to prepare for the effects of global warming now, so we can reduce the costs of dealing with climate change impacts such as flooding, pests, pathogens and invasive species that will cause habitat destruction, water quality degradation and other problems. 

 

The bond will allow the state to reduce the cost of dealing with invasive species, which nationally has been estimated as high as $137 billion per year, and is increasing.  Economic costs include direct control efforts, lost recreational options and reductions in property values.

 

More information, including background information on the Environmental Bond Bill and the Coalition for the Environmental Bond can be seen at www.envirobondorg.

 

Police Log

April 8, 2008 - A Verizon worker discusses the situation at the water main break yesterday at Fisher and Jericho Hill Roads.

3/29/08 Saturday

Building and patrol checks

21:51 MVStop violation Route 9 and Deerfoot road

15:58 fire alarm route 9 business

15:31 guest will not leave, route 9

14:50 medical Cherry Street

14:43 fire alarm Central Street

12:32 residential alarm Richards Road

10:39 residential alarm Richards road

08:50 parking complaint Oak Hill Road and Route9 blocking road

07:02 fire system testing route 9

06:29 DPW sand roads

05:021 mutual aid Ashland Oregon Road hit and run

3/28/08 Friday

Building and patrol checks

911 Hang-ups: Main Street

Radar & Traffic enforcement: Rout 9 @ Middle Road, Newton Street, Southville Road, Boston Road @ Central Street; Southville Road and River Street, Route 85, Route 85 and 9

20:35 silver pickup all over road

20:14Northboro Road Medical

19:03 MVA route 9

18:31 route 9 and Boston Road slow operator

15:05 Biker riding in traffic route 9 and Middle Road

14:55 fingerprinting  More Police Log

CHORAL CONCERT

Saturday, May 10th, 2008

8 PM

A MASS FOR PEACE

The Armed Man by Karl Jenkins

(A stirring plea for world peace including sacred & secular text

from many religions & cultures)

ASSABET VALLEY MASTERSINGERS

And Orchestra

Robert P. Eaton, Artistic Director

with

Algonquin Regional High School Chorus, Director Joshua Miller

Algonquin Regional High School

79 Bartlett Street, Northborough

Accessible to the physically challenged

Assistive listening systems available

Large print programs

Tickets: $15; $12 Students/Seniors

Advanced sale discount $1

Information: (978)-562-9838 or www.avmsingers.org 

Alene E. Cole, Publicity

(978)-562-9838

Editorial

While Southborough has taken care of our schools over the last several years with new buildings and renovations Southborough cannot say the same for our other public buildings. In 2003 Town Selectmen established the Municipal Facilities Committee. Its mission is to develop a long term plan for evaluations, maintaining and recommending when and if municipal buildings (not including schools) need major repairs, renovations or new construction of facilities. The Public Safety buildings currently housing police and fire have taken a top priority of the committee.

If you have never been into the Southborough Police Station, you might want to ask the police officers to tour the station before Town Meeting and article 10. You will be surprised that a town that considers itself technologically advanced and sometimes ahead of the times fares badly when it comes to the Southborough Police Station. In the feasibility study of the police station from Durland Van Voorhis the following were considered of most concern: Congestion at the dispatch and communications area due to small room size, poor separation of dispatch and communications from other building areas, promoting distractions and inadequate security under some conditions; change in level between sally port and booking room which is potentially dangerous in the case of a struggle and not handicapped accessible; Congestion at the prisoner handling area due to small room sizes and joint use of corridors for prisoner and office use; path to Chief’s office, training room and other public areas from public lobby intersects with prisoner handling; congestion at the main entry caused by proximity of main door to service window in this long narrow space; inadequate conditions for storing evidence; A single unisex staff toilet and showering facility (this has now been remedied by Facilities staff. However, although there are now a men’s bathroom and women’s bathroom, it is only one of each with one shower each not sufficient for shifts coming and going); Non accessible upper and lower levels of the facility (an elevator is required) and an exercise area that is poorly located for best security given shared access by the fire department. Additional concerns included Undersized staff locker and shower facilities; inadequate property storage area (industrial type storage trailer located behind the building); insufficient desk space for all staff needs; no air lock vestibule at public entry; poor thermal control due to inadequate heating and ventilation.

As the Annual Town meeting is quickly approaching here is an earlier article the Southborough News did with photos of the Southborough Police Station.

Need for a new Police Station?

Reprinted from January 25, 2008 - by Linda Hubley.   Most municipal buildings in Southborough have not seen dramatic changes, additions or renovations since being built. We have added on and built new schools but we as a community have not kept pace over the years with our other municipal buildings. In 2004 the Southborough Municipal Committee was created and charged with investigating the needs and spaces of all the municipal facilities within the town. The findings released in 2005, showed that the town has reached critical mass for the need of more office space, storage space and creative work environments. The dearth of space and the fact that many of the offices are not in central locations have oftentimes hampered or created inefficient delivery of the services the town offers to its residents.

     At the top of the Municipal Facilities Committee were the police and fire stations. A few years ago the Southborough Fire Department operated out of two stations. Station 2 on Harrington Court is now closed with no personnel stationed at that building. All fulltime personnel work out of the Main Station that was built in 1978 but has not seen much rehabilitation. At the same time the Fire Station meeting room is being used much more than in previous years due to the lack of meeting facilities in town. The apparatus bay cannot efficiently house all the vehicles and equipment necessary. But even more critical than the fire station is the condition of the current police station.

     Have you ever had the opportunity to visit the police station? Whether it was on a tour with your child, have someone that has been arrested or placed in protective custody, you had to speak with a detective or Sergeant or just picking up accident forms you would notice the need for a new police station.

     The existing building that currently houses the police was built in 1929 as an elementary school and many residents living in town remember it fondly as the Peter’s High School Annex. On May 1, 1971, the old school became the “new” Southborough Police Station. The Town’s population at that time was under 6,000 residents and the name “Metrowest” had not even been coined yet. Since then the population in Southborough has increased to near 10,000, a 52% growth just since the 1990 census. Towns in the Metrowest area including Southborough have seen unprecedented growth in new homes, businesses and traffic.

       The study presented to the committee from Durland Van Voorhis Architects describes the police station as lacking many code-compliance features such as no elevator for the handicapped, inadequate clearances and hardware at doors and bathrooms. Poor circulation and thermostat control, poor water flow control, inadequate ventilation. The station also has a series of faults in the width and flow of hallways. The town’s critical communication center is improperly housed and the entire layout of the current facility housing the police is woefully inadequate for today’s police requirements.

     Besides an antiquated dispatch room, the Police station also has to contend with a narrow aisle way notorious for corners, obstacles and small rooms to bring a prisoner in from the sally port to the booking room, to detective rooms or the jail cell itself. This makes for a very congested and dangerous trip for the officers. In other inadequacies in the police station there is a second floor and the basement, neither for which is an elevator available. Due to the lack of storage space the hallways become storage space which narrows them even further. Access to the attic   Continue story with photos Click Here

Town of Southborough

Community Emergency Response Team

(CERT)

Are you a motivated person looking for ways to help your family, neighbors and community during times of emergencies and disasters and be a part of vital team?

The Town of Southborough Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) is looking for citizen volunteers to join the Town’s Citizen Emergency Response Team (CERT).

CERT is a nationally recognized program that organizes and trains citizens to assist in vital roles during various community and regional emergencies. Members provide critical support in basic emergency medical treatment, fire suppression, and light search and rescue services in coordination with professional emergency responders. CERT members also assist in vital non-hazardous roles during emergencies such as clerical and business related assistance, providing specialized and 4x4 equipment, and providing specialized skills, such as structural engineering and auto repair. CERT members assist in other vital non-hazardous roles during emergencies such as providing clerical and business related assistance, such as accounting, providing specialized equipment, such as off-road vehicles and providing specialized skills, such as structural engineering and auto repair. CERT members are also trained in disaster preparedness and take part in projects during non-disaster times to improve the safety of their communities.

As a Southborough CERT member you will receive free classroom and hands-on training on various related topics and qualify for several national certifications.

If you are at least 18 years of age, a resident of Southborough or a surrounding town and are committed to the helping others and the community we encourage you to join!

To apply or receive further information please contact SEMA Director of Operations Neal Aspesi at (508) 485-3235 ext 437 or naspesi@southboroughma.com  Applications are also available on line at www.southboroughfire.org  under “Emerg. Management”.

Upcoming Orientation Dates:

Saturday, April 26, 2008, at 10:00am

Tuesday, May, 6, 2008, at 7:00pm

Both meetings will be held at the Southborough Fire Station at 21 Main Street. The meetings are open to the public and refreshments will be served.

RHS Sports Schedule 4/8/08

Girls Varsity Lacrosse @ Nipmuc Regional HS   3:30PM
 
 Boys JV Lacrosse @ **Postponed - North Middlesex H S   4:00PM
 
 Girls JV Lacrosse @ Nipmuc Regional HS   5:00PM
 
 Boys JV Volleyball @ Fitchburg H.S.   5:00PM
 
 Boys Freshman Lacrosse @ Hopkinton High School   5:15PM
 
 Boys Varsity Lacrosse @ **Postponed - North Middlesex H S   5:30PM
 
 Boys Varsity Volleyball @ Fitchburg H.S.   6:00PM

AVRTHS Sports Schedule 4/8/08

Boys

Varsity

Track

@

**Postponed - Blackstonevalleyregtechhs Click for directions

 

3:30PM

 

 Girls

Varsity

Track

@

**Postponed - Blackstonevalleyregtechhs Click for directions

 

3:30PM

 

 Boys

JV

Lacrosse

VS

Hudson High School

 

3:30PM

 

 Boys

Freshman

Baseball

VS

North Shore Tech. H.S.

 

3:30PM

 

 Girls

JV

Softball

VS

Hudson Catholic HS

 

3:30PM

Susan Bezanson

 

 

Susan Bezanson BERLIN Susan (Eaves) Bezanson, 44, of Berlin, died on Thursday, April 3, 2008, at her home after a 15-year battle with breast cancer. She was the wife of Andy Bezanson. An unrelenting spirit enabled her to manage a demanding professional life and a passionate love of outdoor life. Sue Eaves committed herself to a career in transfusion medicine in 1986, when she graduated from the University of Vermont and joined the laboratory at Nantucket Cottage Hospital. Although island life in those early years had its appeal, Sue and her new friend, Andy Bezanson, soon moved ashore to pursue their goals. Supervisory and management positions at Dana Farber Cancer Institute and New England Medical Center followed. She conducted research at Deaconess Hospital where she obtained certification as a specialist in blood banking. She was a devoted member and past president of the Massachusetts Association of Blood Banks. An authority in blood bank management, she served as lead lab inspector, assisting hospitals in the Northeast achieve accreditation in transfusion medicine. From 1994 until cancer forced semi-retirement early this year, Sue served at Faulkner Hospital, where she was dedicated to promoting patient safety and quality assurance in blood transfusion. Sue championed for uncompromising patients care. She was honored with a Partners in Excellence citation from Partners Healthcare, and the Norman Sadowsky Award for Excellence for outstanding accomplishments, dedication and passion. Sue was not skilled at relaxing. Her technical and management experience was brought to bear in volunteer work with the Berlin Rescue Squad. On winter weekends, Sue loved the time she spent at Sunday River, where she was a member of the volunteer ski patrol for 16 years. Her skill and dedication earned her the nickname, Little Ski. In the spring and summer, she found release in meticulously maintaining and sailing on an old wooden schooner, Green Dragon. She was a valued shipmate, handling more than her share. In all these activities Sue and Andy were inseparable, and usually accompanied by their Weimaraner, Libby, and then Maggie. When cancer got in the way of skiing, she switched her energy to creating beautiful pieces of woven beaded jewelry for her friends, then donated the proceeds for Breast Cancer Research. Susan was born in Nebraska and grew up in Salem, N.H, daughter of Verna Eaves of Pittsburgh, Pa., and the late Gerard Eaves. In addition to her husband and mother, she is survived by two brothers, Ronald Eaves of Charlotte, N,C., Donald Eaves and his wife, Kerry, and their children, Danielle and Megan of Jacksonville, Fla.; mother and father-in-law, Phyllis and Allan Bezanson of Southborough; sister-in-law Kristina Villaire, and her children, Camden and Nathaniel of Virginia Beach; and her beloved dog, Maggie. Calling hours are Friday, April 11, from 4 to 8 p.m., at Morris Funeral Home (morrisfuneralparlor.com), 40 Main St., Southborough. A memorial service will be held Saturday, April 12, at 11 a.m., at Pilgrim Church, Common Street, Southborough. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Susan G. Komen for the Cure, 5005 LBJ Fwy, Suite 250, Dallas, TX 75244.
 

**NOTICE**

WATER MAIN BREAK

Fisher and Jericho Hill Roads

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 7, 2008 - A Utilities marking mistake led to Verizon workers drilling into the water main at the intersection of Jericho Hill Road and Fisher Road.  This caused the Southborough DPW to shut off the water to about 50 homes in the area of Fisher Road, Jericho Hill Road, Andrew's Way and Barn Lane, Schipper Road.  As of 12:20 the DPW employees were working on repairing the main.

Wayward Toilet

April 7, 2008 - Although this looks like the home owner might be having contractors working on their home, this wayward toilet fell off a Handy House truck earlier this morning along Route 85.  Southborough DPW workers managed to move it to the edge of the road to await the company to retrieve it.

Southborough meetings

April 7- April 11, 2008

Meeting

Date

Time

Where

Advisory Committee 4/7 7:30 PM Hearing room Town House
BOARD OF SELECTMEN
Agenda
4/8 7:00 PM hearing room town house
Council on Aging 4/9 7:00 PM Director's Office Cordaville Hall
Open Space Preservation 4/9 7:00 PM Hearing Room Town House
Scholarship Advisory Committee 4/9 7:30 PM Country Kitchen Cordaville Hall
Community Preservation 4/10 7:00 PM hearing room town house

Imagination

April 7, 2008 - If you use your imagination or think like a child. These trees in the Sudbury River swamp could be the legs and toes of a dinosaur from ancient times when they did roam the earth.

 

The Senior High Youth Group of Pilgrim Congregational Church, Southborough
is holding a Yard Sale on Saturday, May 3, 2008 from 8am-12noon at the
church on Common Street, rain or shine!  We are selling spaces for $15.00,
where you can set up your table and sell all those unwanted treasures you
have hiding in your attic, garage or basement.  Please call 508-329-1381 to
reserve you space today.  Don't wait, they are going fast!

 

Southborough Senior Center Schedule

Monday 7

Tuesday 8

Wednesday 9

Thursday 10

Friday 11

8:30 Health clinic

8:30 Walking Group

9:30 AM Painting

8:30 Health Clinic

9:00 Stow airport mini bus

9:30 Cribbage

11:00 Senior Singers

 

9:30 Mah Jongg

 
 

11:30 AM Lunch

10:00 AM Pool 10:00 Creative Writers 12:00 PM lunch
 

12:00 Ping Pong

11:00 chair exercise colonial gardens 11:30 AM Lunch 12:00 PM Lunch

Blue Plate Special soup and sandwich

12:15 PM Pitch

 

12:15 PM Pitch

1:00 water aerobics

12:00 lunch

1:00 water aerobics 12:00 PM Lunch

1:00 PM bridge

 

2:00 PM fitness

 

2:00 Fitness

 

 

Calling all Massachusetts artists working in all disciplines;

STAND UP AND BE COUNTED!

The Joint Committee on Tourism, Arts & Cultural Development, along with the members of the State House Artists Working Group, encourages Massachusetts artists working in all disciplines to answer the Artists Foundation's “Stand Up and Be Counted questionnaire”. We urge individuals, businesses, cities, towns, municipalities, and arts organizations to help spread the word about this questionnaire to artists across the Commonwealth. The statewide questionnaire is open to all: visual, writers, journalist, poets, performing artists, new media artists, craft artists, moving image/film makers, and more. The questionnaire is online and also can be downloaded at: www.artistsfoundation.org  (The AF can also mail the questionnaire to those who do not have internet access. 617-464-3559 Please note that most Massachusetts Public Libraries have free internet access)

This privately funded questionnaire tool has three goals and key uses:

1.) It is an online questionnaire tool that can act as a census of individual artists on a state level, local-city/town level, and a discipline level.

2.) It is an online questionnaire tool that can act as an economic impact study of individual artists on a state level, local-city/town level, and a discipline level.

3.) It is an online questionnaire tool that can act a survey and collect data from individual artists of all disciplines in our state

"I think this is a terrific idea and I'm amazed it hasn't been done before,"

said Chairman Eric Turkington of the Legislature's Joint Committee on Tourism,

Arts, and Cultural Development." We all know that our state's artists are among the most creative and numerous in the nation. Exactly how numerous is a very important question that Stand Up and Be Counted will be able to better answer."

"I'm thankful for all the people who recognized the need for this survey and worked to make it a reality. I look forward to seeing the results and understanding more about our diverse artist population." said Senator Jim Marzilli, Senate Chairman of the Joint Committee of Tourism, Arts, and Cultural Development.

Unlike many studies, all of the aggregate data will be shared. "The questionnaire is designed as an accessible, on-line grass-roots tool that can be shared with, and replicated by, advocacy and service organizations around the country and the world," said David Galiel, Project Developer, who helps organizations adopt Web 2.0/new media tools and technologies. "All of the aggregate data will be released online for free, in a form that will allow others to research and create their own 'mashups' and data representations. They, in turn can freely share the gathered information with others - while preserving the privacy and data integrity of individual survey records." It is very important to

note that only the aggregate data will be shared. Participants’ contact information will not be made public and is highly protected.

This free tool will help artists advocates, arts advocates, and policy makers working on local, state and even national levels in supporting artists. "This questionnaire is a great way to identify more artists in the Commonwealth who need our support," said State Treasurer Tim Cahill who oversees the State Lottery, which provides tens of millions of dollars each year for arts and cultural programs across the state. "The Stand Up and Be Counted project will help recognize the men and women who help make Massachusetts a more beautiful place to live."

The data collected will also help support the growth of the creative economy in the Commonwealth. "As part of our ongoing efforts to build a strong presence for the creative economy sector, the Patrick Administration is eager to see the result of the "Stand Up and Be Counted" questionnaire," said Daniel O'Connell, Secretary of Housing and Economic Development. "Once the full scope of this industry is determined, we can work collectively to create the conditions for this industry to expand in the Commonwealth."

Although this questionnaire project is spear-headed by the Artists Foundation, the effort is really a collaborative one. "We are very grateful to all the individuals and organizations who helped with this project especially Springboard for the Arts and the Artists Health Care Working Group* and we are also thankful to all the individuals and the organizations, such as the Massachusetts Cultural Council, the Arts Foundation of Cape Cod, ArtsUnited/Fall River, the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners, MAASH, and so many others who are helping to get the word out about this questionnaire to artists across the state" said Kathleen Bitetti, artist and executive director of the Artists Foundation.

The State House Artists Working Group was formed in 2007 to explore how the Commonwealth of Massachusetts could better support the artists community. The members of the working group are: the Joint Committee on Tourism, Arts and Cultural Development, the Joint Committee on Economic Development and Emerging Technologies, the Joint Committee of Community Development and Small Business, the State Treasurer's Office, the Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development, and the Artists Foundation.

*The Artists Foundation (AF) has been using the ground breaking 2007 Minnesota study, Artists Count, conducted by Springboard for the Arts & MN Citizens for the Arts as an advocacy tool. However, it became clear that there was a real need to collect Massachusetts artist data. The Artists Foundation (AF) collaborated with Springboard for the Arts (MN)  and the Artists Health Care Working Group to create this new tool. The members of the Artists Health Care Working Group are: the Artists Foundation, Health Care for All, Health Law Advocates, the Access Project, the Insurance Partnership, the Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts of Massachusetts, the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers, the Massachusetts Hospital Association, and the four Commonwealth Care health plans: Boston Medical Center Health Net Plan, Neighborhood Health Plan, Network Health, and Fallon Community Health Plan. Input was also given by the Blue Cross Blue Shield Foundation and the Commonwealth Health Connector.

ARHS Sports Schedule 4/7/0

Boys

JV

Baseball

@

Marlborough High School

 

3:30PM

 

 Boys

Varsity

Tennis

@

Milford High School Click for directions

 

3:30PM

 

 Girls

Varsity

Tennis

VS

Milford High School

Algonquin

3:30PM

 

 Boys

Varsity

Outdoor Track

VS

Shrewsbury High School

 

3:30PM

 

 Girls

Varsity

Outdoor Track

@

Shrewsbury High School

 

3:30PM

 

 Girls

JV

Softball

@

Marlborough High School

 

3:30PM

 

 Boys

Freshman

Lacrosse

@

Natick High School

 

4:00PM

 

 Girls

Varsity

Softball

VS

Marlborough High School

 

4:00PM

 

 Boys

Varsity

Baseball

VS

Marlborough High School

 

4:00PM

 

 Boys

JV

Volleyball

VS

Medfield High School

 

6:00PM

 

 Boys

Varsity

Volleyball

VS

Medfield High School

 

7:00PM

AVRTHS Sports Schedule 4/7/08

Boys

Varsity

Lacrosse

VS

South Shore Voc. Tech. HS

 

3:30PM

 

 Boys

Varsity

Baseball

@

Hudson Catholic HS Click for directions

 

3:30PM

 

 Girls

Varsity

Softball

@

Hudson Catholic HS Click for directions

 

3:30PM

 

 Girls

JV

Softball

VS

**Postponed - Hudson Catholic HS

 

3:30PM

 

 Boys

JV

Baseball

VS

Hudson Catholic HS

 

3:30PM

ARHS Varsity Boys Lacrosse

April 7, 2008 - ARHS Boys Varsity Lacrosse Team playing St. Peter Marian.  ARHS won the contest 6 - 3, Saturday.

April 7, 2008

SENATOR PAMELA RESOR RECIEVES PERFECT SCORE

ON 2007 LEGISLATIVE REPORT CARD

Twenty-Third Annual Edition

BOSTON, Mass. — Mass Audubon congratulates Senator Pamela Resor on a perfect environmental score for

2007.  Massachusetts Senators and Representatives showed improvement this year in support of environmental issues, receiving an average B+ on environmental votes in 2007, according to Mass Audubon’s twenty-third annual Legislative Report Card. The average score in the House was 90 percent. The average score in the Senate was 94 percent. The average House score rose 9.6 percent from the previous year, while the Senate’s average score increased 13 percent.

A misprint listed Senator Resor’s score in the 2007 Legislative Report Card as 86%, though her voting record on environmental issues reflects a 100% score. A copy of the corrected 2007 Legislative Report Card and all past report cards are available at http://www.massaudubon.org/advocacy/pages.php?id=270 Mass Audubon’s Legislative Report Card is a compilation of the roll call votes taken by state legislators on environmental bills or funding measures. Such a vote is the single objective measure to evaluate Massachusetts Legislators on their environmental performance. A legislator’s score does not represent an endorsement, or lack thereof, by Mass Audubon.

"I am honored to be recognized for my efforts supporting environmental protection" said Senator Resor. "This is a critical time to be working on disconcerting environmental issues as they gain local, state, and nationwideimportance. The Massachusetts Audubon Society has been a conscientious voice for environmental causes and one which should be applauded. I look forward to continuing the agenda to reduce greenhouse gases, reduce toxic use, and improve water quality." Mass Audubon’s Director of Public Policy and Government Relations, Jack Clarke, said, “Senator Resor has always been a champion on environmental issues and Mass Audubon congratulates her on her perfect score.” Since 1985, Mass Audubon has compiled the environmental voting records of the Massachusetts Legislature to inform citizens of their state legislators’ performance. The Legislative Report Card is a compilation of the roll call votes by state legislators on environmental bills or budget items. It is not a personal evaluation of legislators.

Mass Audubon works to protect the nature of Massachusetts for people and wildlife. Together with more than 100,000 members, wecare for 33,000 acres of conservation land, provide educational programs for 200,000 children and adults annually, and advocate forsound environmental policies at local, state, and federal levels. Mass Audubon's mission and actions have expanded since ourbeginning in 1896 when our founders set out to stop the slaughter of birds for use on women's fashions. Today we are the largestconservation organization in New England. Our statewide network of 45 wildlife sanctuaries welcomes visitors of all ages and servesas the base for our conservation, education, and advocacy work. To support these important efforts, call 800-AUDUBON (283-8266)or visit www.massaudubon.org

ARHS JV Lacrosse

April 6, 2008 - ARHS JV Lacrosse players run the field for control of the ball at yesterdays matchup with St. Peter Marian at 911 field.  Earlier in the afternoon, the ARHS Varsity Lacrosse team beat St. Peter Marian 6 to 3.

 

 

Southborough Trails Club

April 6, 2008 - The first meeting of the newly formed Trails club met earlier this week.  Several citizens met during the first meeting and discussed various issues that they thought to be important about Southborough's trails.  Some of the topics discussed were new trail maps, working with Open Space and the Southborough Open Land Foundation along with existing State and Environmental Land owners such as Sudbury Valley Trustees and the MWRA.  An interpretive trail along the Reservoir, linkage to all trails in town and to those just outside Southborough's borders to link with the Westborough Charm Bracelet, Callahan State Park and SVT properties, The Bay Circuit Trail and with trails maintained by the Hopkinton Trails Club.

One project that is in the works already will be an event on National Trails Day which is June 7, 2008.  More information will be forthcoming about NTD.

Any resident that is interested in joining the trails club may come to the next meeting which will be held at the Southborough Arts Center at the South Union School on Highland Street.  The next meeting is scheduled for Thursday, May 8 at 7:00 PM.

Photo by Hal Kiess

Power of Water

April 6, 2008 - Water rushes over the Cordaville Millpond Dam.

Then and

Now

April 6, 2008 - White's Corner restaurant just before demolition to make way for the new strip mall now called The Crossing that includes Coldstone Ice Cream, Starbucks, Bodyscapes Gym, Panzano's, Tomasso's, Quiznos and a dry Cleaning establishment.  White's Corner was where the Boston to Worcester double track trolley line junctioned off with a line that went over the reservoir to Boston Road and on to Marlborough around 1903. It was at White's Corner that the first boat ride to the Island to raise an American flag that has become tradition on the Fourth of July began.  White's Corner Restaurant was a very popular eating and drinking spot for the locals when the Rossi family established it back in the early 1950's. (photo of White's Corner Restaurant courtesy of Hal Kiess.

 
 
 
Events & Essentials E-news
 
MA/NH
Chapter
April 2008
 
 
 
 

In the News...

"Belly Fat" is linked as a risk factor for Alzheimer's according to a report in the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Read about the report that suggests that people with larger abdomens in their 40s are more likely to have dementia when they reach their 70s. And Watch Dr. Paul Raia, VP of Patient Care & Family Support talk with NECN reporter Ally Donnelly about the study.
 

Nursing Home Quality of Care for those with dementia: time is running out for State Senate Bill 425.  E-mail for the facts amd find out what you can do. 

 

Especially for Family Members

Family members learn practical information and helpful tips for managing the challenge of Alzheimer's.
 
Getting Started (April programs)
4/8 Foxboro, 3:00 pm
4/9 Newton, 6:30 pm
4/17 Adams, 5:00 pm (call 413.499.0691)
4/25 Mattapan, 10:30 am
Call 617.868.6718 to register 
For a complete list of programs [Click Here]
Programs are FREE

24/7/365 Helpline & Care Consultation

 
Family caregiver
It's confidential, it's free. Information, support and local resources.
CALL 800.272.3900
or
Contact us Helpline Online  

VOLUNTEER

We need you! There are many ways to get involved. Find out how you can help. [Click Here] for an updated listing!
Honor Your Personal Champion!
9th Annual Night at the Pops "Wall of Champions"
Contact Colleen Smith by e-mail or call Sheila Watnick at 617.393.2008.
 

Bowling Battle 

For FUN .... For a Great Cause!  Click on the bowling ball to find out about this weekend's event! 
 

Professionals' Conference

A Map Through the Maze
May 14 - Marlboro
Keynote: David Troxel, co-author of the excellent Best Friends Approach to Alzheimer's Care and Best Friends Book of Alzheimer's Activities.
Visit Our Website or call 617.868.6718 for exhibitor or poster session info & brochure and registration
Join Our Mailing List 

Ride for Research

Bus Ad

25, 62 & 100 mile ride options. Help us raise money for critical research. Visit us on the web
Early Bird Special

WalkerCLICK on the Memory Walker & Sign Up TODAY

 
 
Support Groups
Groups meet across MA, including early stage and early onset groups. Find one near you.
  [Learn More]
 

Our Vision:  a world without Alzheimer's disease.

Alzheimer's Association, Massachusetts/New Hampshire Chapter
311 Arsenal Street, Watertown, MA 02472
regional offices:
Lowell, Sandwich, Springfield and Worcester, MA and Bedford, NH
617.868.6718   /   800.272.3900 24/7 Helpline
 

AVRTHS Sports Schedule 4/6/08

no events scheduled

 

ARHS Sports Schedule 4/6/08

no events scheduled