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Archived Page 216

July 10, 2011 - July 16, 2011

Nearing the Finish Line

July 15, 2011 - Southville Road looked like this earlier this week but has now received its' binder course.

Beth Tikvah Synagogue in Westboro is pleased to announce that we will be having an open house and barbecue on Sunday August 28th from 3 – 5 PM.  This will be a great opportunity to get information on our congregation, see our facility, and meet some of our members.  Information will be available about our recent restructuring of membership, including dues reductions, as well as our recent decision to become a non-affiliated congregation. 

In our religious school, Beth Tikvah students are looking forward to a new school year full of fun and learning beginning on Sunday September 11, 2011.  There are still openings for new students.  If you are interested in sending your child to our Religious School and would like some more information, please contact Cindy Avergon, cavergon@aol.com.  Although membership is not required to enroll in the school, membership does have its benefits.  If you have any questions regarding membership at Beth Tikvah Synagogue, please contact Molly Secrest, molly.secrest@verizon.net.  You can also find information about us at our website, www.bethtikvahsynagogue.org

Our Beth Tikvah school recently ended the year the with a Havdallah service led by one of our students, Jacob Robins, who was recognized this year with the Star of David Award for Youth Leadership from Central Massachusetts Israel Bonds.  In addition, the day was extra special as it was the Jewish holiday of Lag b’Omer, the 33rd day of the counting of the Omer.  In Israel, this day is celebrated with outings, bonfires and picnics.  Our students celebrated by making homemade pita on the fire pit and playing games outside in the beautiful weather.  The students reflected on all they had learned over the past year and the fun experiences they had in the Religious School.  They remembered the different holidays they learned about and celebrated with their friends and families and discussed what they hoped to learn in the next year.  In addition to the Jewish holidays, our students learn Bible, Hebrew, prayers, history, Jewish culture, and so much more. 

Beth Tikvah Synagogue is a warm, inclusive, egalitarian, and fully participatory congregation.  It is an inviting and spiritual community which provides a special opportunity for families to grow together under a Jewish umbrella. 

Shop for health insurance, now through August 15

Do you buy individual or family health coverage on your own?  Act now through August 15, 2011 to take advantage of the open enrollment period created by state law.

Most people will be unable to make changes to their current coverage or buy a new plan once the deadline passes.  So use this opportunity to shop and compare health plan prices and benefits.

Go to the Massachusetts Division of Insurance for information on the open enrollment rules.  The Health Connector can help you buy a plan through the Commonwealth Choice program.  You can also contact any Massachusetts health insurance carrier directly.

July 15, 2011 - A new website is up to help residents follow the path toward a new type of town management.

 

Half Day Summer Camps
Kid's Kamp (pk - grade 1)
Kid's Klub (grade 2 - 5)

________

Additional Summer Programs
________

Book your Birthday Party with Recreation
________

Southborough Summer Nights FaceBook

Recreation Commission Meeting
TBD
21 Highland St

website

Sports and Recreation

ARHS Sports Photos by Chris Wraight www.thawkspix.com

WALDEN POND JUNIOR RANGERS

Call 978-369-3254 to pre-register

Since 1997 over 375 area children have participated in the Walden Pond Junior Ranger program. The program introduces children to the outdoors, creates friendships, and brings families together. Activities include hiking, natural history, wildlife & tree identification, ponding, fishing, and cultural history. -Junior Ranger Flyer-

 Walden Pond SR  | Programs/Events  | Parks Listing

Reserve A Campsite

Advanced reservations are available for 29 state forests and park campgrounds. To make a reservation:

    • call toll-free 1-877-I-CAMP-MA or 1-877-422-6762         

    • from outside the U.S. and Canada, call 518-884-4959       (long distance charges apply)

    • TTY customers call 1-877-620-0833


Reservations may be made as early as six months prior to the date of arrival, and as late as one day prior to arrival. Customers may make camping reservations for several dates at one time. However, reservations are limited to 14 cumulative days in any one park between Memorial Day and Labor Day. There is a 2 day minimum on most reservations. Customers must be 18 years or older to make a reservation. ID is required upon registration at the campground.


The call center is open Monday through Sunday 8 am to 8 pm between April and Labor Day. Between September and March, the call center is open Mon through Friday 9 am to 7 pm and 10 am to 5 pm on Saturday and Sunday.


Credit card payments are accepted (Visa, Mastercard and Discover). With personal check or money order transactions, full payment is required within ten (10) days of making the reservation. The reservation transaction charge is $9.25 per reservation.

-more information on the reservation transaction charge-


We look forward to serving you in a MA State Park!

 http://www.mass.gov/dcr/recreate/camping2.htm

or for private camps

http://www.campmass.com/

Overgrowth

July 14, 2011 - Giant mushrooms sprout from an oak tree.  (contributed photo)

27th Annual MUSTANG & FORDS Summer Round-Up at Marlborough, Massachusetts, United States

27th Annual MUSTANG & FORDS Summer Round-Up

Rain Date: 7/24/2011: ALL Mustangs, Shelbys, Ford Family and Factory Ford Powered autos, Stock, Modified or Custom, foreign, domestic or replica will be CLUB JUDGED (ex. 2010s plus: pop. vote) on Cleanliness, Workmanship, Condition, Fit and Finish. NOTE: Fire Extinguishers are required in all show vehicles! Spectators welcome, Admission and Parking are FREE! (Sorry NO Vendor Spaces)

Sports and Recreation

ARHS Sports Photos by Chris Wraight www.thawkspix.com

·         Plastic Containers: #1 thru #7 now accepted
(With glass and metal containers in the designated brown comapctor)

·         Paper: all kinds
Newspaper, white and colored, glossy, catalogs, magazines, junk mail etc.
(In the designated large green bin or the blue bins)

·         Cardboard, brown paper bags and Paperboard (cereal, gift and shoe boxes etc.) (In the designated brown comapctor)

·         No CRT Televisions or Computer Monitors

·         Permits Required but at no charge for;
Refrigerator, Air Conditioners, Himidifiers and Water Coolers

Why Recycle?

·         More solid waste is being generated each year and the cost of solid waste disposal is increasing. By removing recyclables from the waste stream the amount of waste is reduced and costs can thereby be reduced as well.

·         Recycling saves millions of dollars by extending the lives of existing landfills and reducing the construction costs of additional incinerators. When the materials that you recycle go into new products, they don't go into landfills or incinerators, so landfill space is conserved.

·         Our natural resources would diminish more rapidly without using recycled material to replenish the supply of goods.

·         Products made from virgin material use more energy to produce. In most cases, making products from recycled materials creates less air pollution and water pollution than making products from virgin materials.

·         Recycling reduces pollution, and greenhouse emissions that lead to global warming.

·         The recycling industry supports more than 19,000 jobs in Massachusetts. The recycling process creates far more jobs than landfills or incinerators, and recycling can frequently be the least expensive waste management method for cities and towns.

Wednesday
July 13, 2011
6:45 PM
The Willows Lawn, East Main Street

Westwood Swing Band: Willows Concert to Benefit WCLT

Enjoy great music and an ice cream sundae under the stars! Bring your lawn chair. All donations benefit WCLT.
Contact: events@westboroughlandtrust.org

SOUTHBOROUGH FIRE DEPARTMENT

                                DAILY LOG

Tuesday 7/5/11

08:50 PLAN REVIEW - COMMERCIAL CORDAVILLE RD 

    C3   CAPT MAURO

09:45 SCHOOL FIRE DRILL MAIN ST 

    C27  CAPT MAURO

11:00 PLAN REVIEW - SMOKE DETECTOR LEDGE HILL RD 

    C3   CAPT MAURO

12:40 EMS CALL NEWTON ST 

    A28  FF PIERCE       FF NEAL

    C30  LT DANO

12:58 EMS CALL HIGH RIDGE RD 

    A29  LT DANO         FF STRONG

    C27  CAPT MAURO

13:30 SMOKE DETECTOR, RESALE FISHER RD 

    C27  CAPT MAURO

15:00 ANIMAL RESCUE SOUTHWOOD DR 

    T21  LT DANO         FF STRONG

15:00 TRAINING - FIRE MAIN ST 

    HQ1  LT DANO         FF STRONG       FF PIERCE       FF NEAL

16:17 VEH ACCIDENT W/INJURIES ROUTE 495 SOUTH 

    A28  FF PIERCE       FF AMENDOLA

    E23  LT DANO         FF STRONG

Wednesday 7/6/11

10:01 EMS CALL NEWTON ST 

    A28  FF NAVAROLI     FF ASPESI

    C30  FF WILLS

   10:17 EMS CALL NEWTON ST 

    A29  CAPT HUBLEY     FF WILLS

11:51 EMS CALL MAPLECREST DR 

    A28  FF NAVAROLI     FF KANE

    C30  CAPT HUBLEY

    E22  FF ASPESI       FF WILLS

13:05 VEH ACCIDENT W/INJURIES FRAMINGHAM RD and EAST MAIN ST

    A28  FF NAVAROLI     FF ASPESI

    C30  CAPT HUBLEY

    E23  FF WILLS        FF KANE

13:30 SMOKE DETECTOR, RESALE CONSTITUTION DR 

    C27  CAPT MAURO

14:00 SMOKE DETECTOR, RESALE TARA RD 

    C27  CAPT MAURO

14:30 SMOKE DETECTOR, RESALE LEDGE HILL RD 

    C27  CAPT MAURO

20:30 SCHOOL FIRE DRILL MAIN ST 

    C27  CAPT MAURO

23:23 EMS CALL PRESIDENTIAL DR 

    A28  FF ASPESI       FF NAVAROLI

    C30  FF WILLS

    E22  CAPT HUBLEY     FF KANE

Thursday 7/7/11

10:00 MISC. SAFETY INSPECTION TURNPIKE RD 

    C27  CAPT MAURO

11:45 PLAN REVIEW - COMMERCIAL NORTHBORO RD 

    C27  CAPT MAURO

13:30 SMOKE DETECTOR, RESALE ORCHARD RD 

    C27  CAPT MAURO

21:03 EMS CALL TURNPIKE RD 

    A28  FF STRONG       FF PIERCE

    C30  LT DANO

Friday 7/8/11

18:05 EMS CALL EAST MAIN WESTBORO

    A28  FF KANE         FF ROACH

    C30  FF AMENDOLA

Saturday 7/9/11

15:45 EMS CALL NEWTON ST 

    A28  FF SHANAHAN     FF FRANKS

    C30  FF ASPESI

15:47 MOBILE PROP VEH FIRE TURNPIKE RD 

    E22  LT PELTIER      FF MARTINS

21:53 SMOKE SCARE, ODOR OF SMOKE RED GATE LN 

    E22  FF SHANAHAN     FF HOGAN

    T21  LT PELTIER      FF FRANKS       FF MARTINS

Sunday 7/10/11

04:44 VEH ACCIDENT W/INJURIES PINE HILL RD 

    A28  FF FRANKS       FF SHANAHAN

    E23  LT PELTIER      FF MARTINS      FF HOGAN        FF TOMMANEY

12:55 SMOKE SCARE, ODOR OF SMOKE TURNPIKE RD 

    E22  LT SADOWSKI     FF MARTINS

    E23  FF ROACH        FF RICE

13:24 ALARM SYSTEM, UNINTENTIONAL NORTH ST 

    E22  FF MARTINS

    T21  LT SADOWSKI     FF RICE         FF ROACH

21:46 EMS CALL CORDAVILLE RD and TURNPIKE RD

    A28  FF RICE         EMT GLECKEL

Monday 7/11/11

07:48 EMS CALL MARLBORO RD 

    A28  FF SHANAHAN     FF ROACH

    C30  LT PELTIER

07:53 ALARM SYSTEM DUE TO MALFUNCTIO PINE HILL DR 

    C27  CAPT MAURO

    E22  FF ASPESI

    T21  LT SADOWSKI     FF RICE         FF FRANKS

11:00 MISC. SAFETY INSPECTION MT VICKERY RD 

    C27  CAPT MAURO

11:09 EMS CALL MAIN ST 

    A28  FF FRANKS       FF MARTINS

    C30  FF SHANAHAN

12:14 EMS CALL HIGHLAND ST 

    A28  FF FRANKS       FF MARTINS

    C30  FF SHANAHAN

12:30 EMS CALL BOSTON RD 

    A29  LT PELTIER      FF SHANAHAN

    C30  CAPT MAURO

13:14 EMS CALL MAIN ST 

    A28  FF FRANKS       FF MARTINS

    E23  CAPT MAURO

15:00 SMOKE DETECTOR, RESALE WILDWOOD DR 

    C27  CAPT MAURO

16:30 SMOKE DETECTOR, RESALE BANFILL LN 

    C27  CAPT MAURO

17:54 VEH ACCIDENT W/INJURIES TURNPIKE RD 

    A28  FF FRANKS       FF MARTINS

    E23  LT PELTIER      FF SHANAHAN

19:00 TRAINING - FIRE MAIN ST 

    HQ3  LT PELTIER      FF FRANKS       FF SHANAHAN     FF MARTINS

    SC1  LT COLLEARY     FF ALESSI       FF HOGAN        FF TOMMANEY

21:45 EMS CALL NORTH ST 

    A28  FF FRANKS       FF MARTINS

    C30  FF SHANAHAN

 

Southborough School Reading Programs

Algonquin Regional High School – Summer Reading 2011

Based on the success of the “One School, One Book” program last year, all Algonquin students, of all grades and levels, as well as faculty and staff members, will once again be reading one title: Feed by M.T. Anderson.

As always, the goal of summer reading is to encourage students to be life-long readers and to see reading as a pleasurable pastime as well as a source of intellectual growth. Thus, the “One School, One Book” program will build community, increase communication, and foster an appreciation for reading. New to the program this fall, students will be engaged in a variety of activities in every class as each department is responsible for designing an activity unique to their subject matter.

In addition to the department activities, we are ecstatic to announce that the author, M.T. Anderson, is coming to celebrate our “One School, One Book” day! Mr. Anderson – a local author who attended St. Mark’s – plans to read and discuss a portion of the novel with all students. He will also engage in a question and answer session followed by an opportunity to sign the students’ books.

Feed has received many awards which include being a National Book Award finalist and an ALA (American Library Association) Best Books for Young Adults, among others. This book is a current, culturally-relevant, relatable and accessible book for our student population. It is a quick-read that will capture the audience and most importantly foster great discussion in all departments especially about consumerism, media influence and control of culture, the death of the English language, ethical and privacy issues, common decency and respect for others… the list goes on. For ages 14 and up, this story is told from a teenage perspective and does take on the teenage culture with gusto, including the language and activities the characters engage in. While the novel contains coarse language, critics have praised Feed for its ability to reach the teenage generation through “A gripping, intriguing, and unique cautionary novel…” – School Library Journal

A limited supply of books will be available at a reduced rate of $6.40; cash, or check made out to Algonquin Regional High School. Students can stop by Algonquin’s main office (7am to 3pm) to purchase your copy. The book will be on sale while supplies last from June 9 to June 22, and then in July during our summer hours of 8am to 2pm, Tuesday through Thursday. We have also notified local libraries and bookstores, who plan to stock up on copies of this book.

Students taking A.P. courses may have an additional summer reading requirement and can ask their teachers for details.

Thanks for your support and please feel free to contact Algonquin’s main office if you have any questions or concerns.

 

Trottier Reading lists

SUMMER READING LIST FOR INCOMING SIXTH GRADERS

                 June 2011 - Trottier Middle School

Parents have asked us for a book list to help their children select good books.

We offer you this list as a guide for both you and your son or daughter to select

good, enjoyable literature over the summer. We hope that students will take some time over their vacation to discover reading as a source of pleasure.

This reading list is comprised of book titles in three general categories:

Fiction (Adolescent, Historical, Mystery/Suspense, Science Fiction, and

Fantasy), Classics (Fiction that has stood the test of time), and Nonfiction (Biography, True Stories).

Sixth Grade Language Arts Teachers

Key to Categories:

RF Realistic Fiction

AF Adolescent Fiction

C          Classic

F           Fantasy

HF Historical Fiction

MS Mystery/Suspense

NF Nonfiction

SF Science Fiction

ALABAMA MOON (RF)- WATT KEY

THE BIG WANDER (RF) - WILL HOBBS

BLUE HERON (RF) - AVI

THE BLUE SWORD (F)- ROBIN MCKINLEY

THE BOGGART (MS)- SUSAN COOPER

BONE FROM A DRY SEA (F)- PETER DICKINSON

BOTH SIDES OF TIME (AF)- CAROLINE COONEY

CAST TWO SHADOWS (HF)- ANN RIANLDI

CHARLOTTE'S WEB (F,C)- E.B. WHITE

THE CITY OF EMBER & sequels (SF)- JEANNE DUPRAU

THE CONCH BEARER & sequels (F) - CHITRA BANERJEE DIVAKARUNI

COSMIC (F/RF) FRANK BOYLE

THE CRICKET IN TIMES SQUARE (F,C)- GEORGE SELDEN

THE CROSSROADS (MS)- CHRIS GRABENSTEIN

THE DEAD MAN IN INDIAN CREEK (M)- MARY DOWNING HAHN

DEALING WITH DRAGONS (F)- PATRICIA WREDE

DEAR MR. HENSHAW (RF)- BEVERLY CLEARY

DOGSONG (RF)- GARY PAULSEN

DRAGONSONG (HF)- ANNE MCCAFFREY

THE EAR, THE EYE AND THE ARM (F)- NANCY FARMER

THE EGYPT GAME (M)- ZILPHA KEATLEY SNYDER

ELLA ENCHANTED (F)- GAIL LEVINE

EVERY SOUL A STAR (RF)- WENDY MASS

THE FLEDGLING (RF)- JANE LANGTON

FREAKY FRIDAY & sequels (AF)- MARY RODGERS

FREDDIE THE PIG (F)- WALTER BROOKS

GINGER PYE (RF,C)- ELEANOR ESTES

A GIRL NAMED DISASTER (RF) - NANCY FARMER

THE GOLDEN COMPASS & sequels (F)- PHILLIP PULLMAN

THE GREAT BRAIN SERIES (M)- JOHN D. FITZGERALD

THE GREAT GILLY HOPKINS (RF)- KATHERINE PATERSON

HANA'S SUITCASE (NF)- KAREN LEVINE

HARRY POTTER series (F)- J.K. ROWLING

THE HOBBIT (F,C)- J.R.R. TOLKIEN

HOLES (M)- LOUIS SACHAR

HOMER PRICE (RF,C)- ROBERT MCCLOSKEY

IDA B (RF)- KATHERINE HANNIGAN

INCIDENT AT HAWKS HILL (HF)- ALLAN ECKART

THE INCREDIBLE JOURNEY (RF)- SHEILA BURNFORD

THE INDIAN IN THE CUPBOARD (F)- LYNN REID BANKS

ISLAND OF THE BLUE DOLPHINS (HF,C)- SCOTT O'DELL

JOHNNY TREMAIN (HF)- ESTHER FORBES

JULIET'S STORY (AF)- WILLIAM TREVOR

THE LIGHTNING THIEF (F)- RICK RIORDAN

A LONG WAY FROM CHICAGO (HF) - RICHARD PECK

LOVE, RUBY LAVENDER (RF)- DEBORAH WILES

MANIAC MAGEE (RF)- JERRY SPINELLI

MARLEY, A DOG LIKE NO OTHER (NF) JOHN GROGAN

THE MIDWIFE'S APPRENTICE (HF)- KAREN CUSHMAN

THE MIRACULOUS JOURNEY OF EDWARD TULANE (F) KATE DICAMILLO

MRS. FRISBY AND THE RATS OF NIMH (F)- ROBERT C. O'BRIEN

MISTY OF CHINCOTEAGUE (RF,C)- MARGUERITE HENRY

THE MOORCHILD (F)- ELOISE MCGRAW

THE NAME OF THIS BOOK IS SECRET (F) PSEUDONYMOUS BOSCH

NIGHTJOHN (HF)- GARY PAULSEN

THE OUTCASTS OF 18 SCHUYLER PLACE (RF)- E.L. KONIGSBURG

P.S. LONGER LETTER LATER (AF)- PAULA DANZIGER & ANN MARTIN

REDWALL SERIES (F)- BRIAN JACQUES

THE REVEALERS (RF)- DOUG WILHELM

SARAH PLAIN AND TALL (RF)- PATRICIA MACLACHLAN

THE SECRET OF PLATFORM 13 (F)- EVA IBBOTSON

SEE BEHIND TREES (HF)- MICHAEL DORRIS

THE SHAMER'S DAUGHTER (F)- LENE KAABERBOL

SHILOH (RF)- PHYLLIS REYNOLDS NAYLOR

THE SKULL OF TRUTH (F)- BRUCE COVILLE

THE SLAVE DANCER (HF)- PAULA FOX

SOLDIER'S HEART (HF)- GARY PAULSEN

S.O.R. LOSERS (AF)- AVI

SOUND OF CHARIOTS (HF) - MOLLY HUNTER

SQUASHED (AF)- JOANN BAUER

STRIDER (AF)- BEVERLY CLEARY

STRAWBERRY HILL (HF) MARY ANN HOBERMAN

STUART LITTLE (F,C)- E.B. WHITE

TOM'S MIDNIGHT GARDEN (F)- PHILIPPA PEARCE

TREE OF FREEDOM (HF)- REBECCA CAUDILL

THE TRUMPET OF THE SWAN (F)- E.B. WHITE

TWILIGHT CHILD (F)- SALLY WARNER

THE UPSTAIRS ROOM (NF)- JOHANNA REISS

THE VIEW FROM SATURDAY (F)- E.L. KONIGSBURG

WAR HORSE (HF) MICHAEL MORPURGO

WARRIOR SCARLET (HF)- ROSEMARY SUTCLIFF

THE WATSONS GO TO BIRMINGHAM (HF)- CHRISTOPHER PAUL CURTIS

WHEN YOU REACH ME (RF)- REBECCA STEAD

WHERE THE MOUNTAIN MEETS THE MOOM (F) GRACE LIN

WHERE THE RED FERN GROWS (HF, C)- WILSON RAWLS

THE WHIPPING BOY (HF)- SID FLEISCHMAN

THE WHITE GIRAFFE (RF)- LAUREN ST. JOHN 

THE WILLOUGHBYS (RF)- LOIS LOWRY

WIND RIDER (HF) SUSAN WILLIAMS

THE WITCH OF BLACKBIRD POND (HF,C)- ELIZABETH GEORGE SPEAR

WIZARD OF EARTHSEA (F,C)- URSULA LEGUIN

THE WOLFLING (AF)- STERLING NORTH

THE WOLVES OF WILLOUGHBY CHASE (RF)- JOAN AIKEN

WOODSONG (NF)- GARY PAULSEN

A WRINKLE IN TIME (F,C) - MADELEINE L'ENGLE

THE YEAR MY PARENTS RUINED MY LIFE (RF) MARTHA FREEMAN

More Schools and grades later this week

Sports and Recreation

ARHS Sports Photos by Chris Wraight www.thawkspix.com

Congratulations to Southborough

Summer Teams    

Back Row: Asst Coaches Chris Schifferdecker, John Pappas, Steve Courtwright, and Mark Zides. Head Coach Alan Osetek
 Middle Row: Ryan Courtwright, Jimmy Tobin, Alex Pappas, Jack Martin, Drew Courtwright
 Front Row: Timmy Dunderdale, Kyle Henderson, Zach Zides, Zach Osetek and Justin Langway
 Not Pictured: Trevor Schifferdecker and Zach Smith

Congratulations to the Southborough District 11 Team who have now won two straight summer tournaments and are currently 10-1 in games played.  

For the Easton Tournament, Southborough played 5 games and were undefeated entering the finals where they played a tough championship game against fierce competitor, Rayhnam, beating them in the 6th inning, 4 - 2. Noteworthy is the fact that in this tournament, the boys outscored their opponents 53 - 15 over the 5 game run.

Regarding the Mansfield Summer Classic Tournament, this was the Southboro 11s first time playing in this highly competitive event that featured some of the best teams from eastern and southern Massachusetts. Their championship drive included big wins this past Sunday in the semi-finals against last years Mansfield winner Wellesley 7-0 and an equally impressive 7-1 championship game victory against Medfield.  The focus now turns to District play and an always tough Milford tournament. Congrats to the boys and good luck with your next two tournaments.

Back Row: Asst Coaches Mark Zides, John Pappas, Steve Courtwright, and Chris Schifferdecker. Head Coach Alan Osetek
Middle Row: Trevor Schifferdecker, Jack Martin, Alex Pappas, Jimmy Tobin,  Ryan Courtwright, Drew Courtwright
Front Row: Zach Osetek, Zach Zides, Zach Smith, Justin Langway, Timmy Dunderdale
Laying Down: Kyle Henderson

Chestnut Hill Farm Annual Work Day

July 16,  9am – 3 pm

The Trustees need your help! Feel free to come out for the whole day or just a morning or afternoon. Individuals young and old, big and small can equally contribute. Students and scouts can receive community service hours. Our tasks will vary based on specific property needs from clearing unwanted weeds that threaten the native species, to performing light trail maintenance or building water bars. Collectively we will learn a bit about the property we are helping and meet other dedicated volunteers. Refreshments will be provided. Plan to bring your own lunch if you'd like to spend the day. Wear long sleeves and pants, and bring water and gloves if you have them.

For more information on Chestnut Hill Farm as well as directions please visit:

http://www.thetrustees.org/places-to-visit/greater-boston/chestnut-hill-farm.html

Pre-registration is helpful but not required: 508-785-0339 or charlesrivervalley@ttor.org

 

Meeting Date Time Place
Planning Board - Agenda July 11 7:00 PM McAuliffe Hearing Room, Town House
Drafting Committee for Town Manager Legislation - Agenda July 12 7:00 PM McAuliffe Hearing Room, Town House
Board of Health - Agenda July 13 1:00 PM Board of Health Office, 9 Cordaville Road
       

  Southborough Senior Center
11 Monday 12 Tuesday 13 Wednesday 14 Thursday 15 Friday 16 Saturday
8:30 walking group 8:30 walking group 8:30 walking group 9:30 game day @ Hopkinton Senior Center 8:30 Walking Fitness Challenge open 9:00 AM Noon

 

 

9:30 Mah Jongg
9:00 Health Clinic 9:30 Tai Chi   10:00 Beginner Poker 10:00 Canasta
9:30 Cribbage 10 Bocce 9:00 Health Clinic 10:00 Beginner Tai Chi  
A Matter of Balance 12:00 Ping Pong 9:30 Pool 10:00 AM Bocce  
  12:00 Pitch   12:00 Bridge  
      12:00 Pitch  

Sunday  10 Monday 11 Tuesday 12 Wednesday 13 Thursday 14 Friday 15 Saturday 16
 
 
 
 
 
 
   

 


 

 

academic,girls,kids,libraries,people,references,books

We have been gearing up for Summer Reading in the Children’s Room! This year’s theme is “One World, Many Stories”. There will be lots of activities going on all summer, including weekly trivia contests, a flag game, library passports, raffles, a hidden bookworm, and more! Also, kids can keep a reading log and keep track of all the books they read this summer. We’ll be counting how many books are read in total, with a goal of beating last summer’s total of 4,034! All of these activities and materials are available in the Children’s Room.

We’ll have lots of special programs and activities as well, including Pajama Story Time, movies on Thursday afternoons, a concert, a storyteller, and lots more! Check out the “Calendar of Activities” under the “About Us” tab for a full listing of programs.

“One World, Many Stories” is sponsored by your local library, the Massachusetts Library System, the Boston Bruins, and the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners. Also, many thanks to the Friends of the Library for sponsoring our special events. Please call the Library at 508-485-5031 with any questions. Hope to see you this summer.

 

July 11, 2011 - Continuing with the names on the monument.

PRIVATE    PATRICK KILGARIFF    

·          Private Patrick Kilgariff was born in Ireland on February 20th, 1847.  

·         He enlisted in December 1864 and mustered into the Massachusetts Volunteers, Infantry.

·         He fought in ten conflicts between May 6th and July 30th, 1864.  

·         Private Kilgariff was killed at Burnsides Mine, in   Petersburg, VA. on July 30th, 1864  at the age of 17.    

·         The grave site of Private Patrick Kilgariff’s remains is unknown.

 

PRIVATE   RICHARD MULSTEE  

·         Private Richard Mulstee was born in Ireland in   1819.

·         He enlisted in February 1864  and mustered into the Massachusetts Volunteers, Infantry.

·         He fought in seven conflicts from May 6th to May 18th, 1864.

·         Private Mulstee was killed at the Battle of North Anna River, VA, at the age of 45.     

·          The grave site of Private Richard Mulstee’s    remains is unknown.

PRIVATE   GEORGE W. NICHOLS    

·         Private George Nichols was born in Lowell, MA, on  May 22, 1842.  

·         He enlisted in August 1861 and mustered into the Massachusetts Volunteers, Infantry.

·         He fought in five conflicts between June 18th and July 1st 1862.

·         Private Nichols was wounded at the battle of Malvern Hill, VA on July 1st, 1862, and sent to the U.S. Hospital at Newark N.J. where he died on September 16th, at the age of 20.    

·          Private George W. Nichols’s remains were buried in Southborough.

PRIVATE     AUSTIN G. PARKER    

·          Private Austin Parker was born in Lowell, MA, on February 13th, 1844.

·         He enlisted in June 1861 and mustered into the  Massachusetts Volunteers, Infantry.

 

·         He fought in the battles of Cedar Mountain, VA. and Rappahannock Station during August of 1862.

·         Private Parker was wounded during the battle at Grovetown, VA. on August 30th, 1862.  He died in Clifbern Hospital, Washington D.C., on
November 6th, ,   at the age of 18.     

·          Private Austin G. Parker’s remains were buried in Southborough.

LINCOLN, MA.- DeCordova presents Wall Works, the newest exhibition in a series of projects designed to rethink and recontextualize the Permanent Collection. For Wall Works, on view June 11, 2011–Spring 2012, six artists were invited to create site-specific wall installations in response to the Museum’s collection of modern and contemporary American art. In preparation for the exhibition, artists Kysa Johnson, Natalie Lanese, Caleb Neelon, Alison Owen, Justin Richel, and Mary Temple trolled the Museum’s database of 3,500 objects and selected an artwork to serve as a source of inspiration for their proposed “wall work.” The artists identified artworks that resonated with their varied interests and aesthetics and have consequently assembled an eclectic assortment of objects from deCordova’s collection ranging from Teenie Harris’s civil rights era documentary photographs to the quiet and poetic sculptural work of Rebecca Doughty. Sited in the Dewey Family Gallery and the Museum’s Café, these new installations reflect each artist’s own practice while creatively engaging the Permanent Collection as an educational, historical, and inspirational entity.
 
 Additionally, the newly created wall installations reference different artistic traditions of working directly on the wall. Caleb Neelon’s installation draws on the history of slogans through street art, placards, bumper stickers, and buttons in his graphic portrayal of the visual language of political activism. Alison Owen’s subtle investigation of space emerges from the conceptual practice of Sol LeWitt’s architectural wall drawings, while Natalie Lanese’s pop-tastic assemblage refers to the tradition of murals as narrative epics. Justin Richel’s delicately rendered sweets and Kysa Johnson’s dense chalk drawings on blackboard call upon early fresco techniques, whereas Mary Temple’s use of the wall as conduit speaks to the history of site-specific artwork. Working in various media – painting, drawing, collage, and sound art – the artists in Wall Works reflect the wide range of installation practices today and their projects collectively trace a larger history of bypassing the canvas for the wall. Wall Works is organized by deCordova’s Koch Curatorial Fellow Lexi Lee Sullivan.
 
 Wall Works is a curatorial conflation of the site-specific and historically-aware practice of artist, Fred Wilson, the “artist as curator” exhibition model, and the diversity of installation practices today. In his 1992 project, Mining the Museum, Wilson curated an exhibition from Maryland Historical Society's collection to critically expose the subjectivity and bias in institutional displays.

Through surprising juxtapositions, Wilson demonstrated how changes in context create changes in meaning. The popular “artist as curator” exhibition model, like The Museum of Modern Art’s Artist’s Choice series, invites artists to curate their own exhibitions from the institutional vault. Wall Works stems from these museological precedents of mining the collection for new relational meaning, but by engaging contemporary installation practice creates a new space for dialogue between the collection, the wall works, and contemporary art practice.
 
 Wall Works curator Lexi Lee Sullivan says “The artist-as-curator model creates surprising and unexpected juxtapositions, which in Wall Works gives the collection a renewed energy by recontextualizing the works within contemporary installation practice. An eclectic group of works have been selected from the Collection—objects which never would have been exhibited together under any other theme and generate a certain spark when seen in this context.”
 
 Based in Brooklyn, NY, Kysa Johnson weaves art historical compositions with the molecular structure of toxins fusing art with environmental history, to reflect upon our complicated relationship with nature. Her wall drawings speak in the language of science, and invite viewers to consider matter and issues beyond visual perception. For Wall Works, Johnson selected Chemical Brook Enters the Sudbury River, a large color photograph by the acclaimed landscape photographer, Frank Gohlke. This photograph is part of a larger, five-year project titled, Living Water, in which Gohlke photographed the length of the Sudbury River as part of an environmental activist project that culminated in a show at deCordova in 1993. The Sudbury River runs from Westborough, MA through Concord, MA and has long been polluted by chemicals from the Nyanza Corporation’s textile factory located in Ashland. In blow up 152, Kysa Johnson uses the actual molecular structure of the pollutants found in the Sudbury River as the building blocks for her drawing which takes its larger compositional shape from Gohlke’s photograph. Seen side-by-side, the works tell a more nuanced history of the impact of industrialization on the New England landscape.
 
 Natalie Lanese is a collage artist from Cleveland, OH who currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Sports and Recreation

ARHS Sports Photos by Chris Wraight www.thawkspix.com

 

FULL MOON PADDLE

Date: Friday, July 15, Time: 7:15-9:30 pm
Location: Lake Whitehall, Hopkinton
Leader/Speaker: SVT Volunteer Simon Vos and Director of Membership Michael Sanders
Lake Whitehall is a very clean and serene lake, shallow and easy to maneuver. You will paddle around and explore some of the many small islands found at the lake. The area teems with wildlife; there is a good chance of seeing a beaver lodge. Experienced paddlers only!
Member Fee: Free | Non-Member Fee: $10

Register for this Event

 

view details

Climb to the Clouds

A Century ride to Mt. Wachusett
in Princeton Massachusetts

Note: All rides return to the start point

Sunday, July 17, 2011

Spend the day with fellow cyclists touring
through the apple orchard country of east central Massachusetts.

  • Rides from 48 to 100 miles
  • Mostly back country roads
  • Magnificent views
  • Great company!

Charles River Wheelmen

 

Looking for Flowers and a Nice trip?

July 10, 2011 - A couple of spots to visit would be Garden in the Woods in Framingham and Tower Hill Botanical in Boylston.

Meeting notes from Selectmen's meeting July 5, 2011

Facilities Manager Phil Rinehart consolidated positions within town and the library.  David Falconi was appointed to the twenty hour maintenance position.  The Recreation Facilities budget had forced Mr. Rinehart to cut two maintenance positions but working with budgets and the town library they were able to work on budget to pull together a position that would benefit the library and the town house. The pay will be $17.30 per hour with benefits.   Combo of Dave’s old job and library custodian.  The library position was a twelve hour position but has been moved to a twenty hour and it is budgeted and will cover the library and the town house.  The Board of Selectmen unanimously approved Mr. Falconi.

Selectmen interviewed five candidates for Southborough Patrolman positions.  William Woodford III was first to be interviewed.   He grew up in Southborough attending Southborough schools and St. John’s in Shrewsbury.  Mr. Woodford took Criminal Justice classes from Champlain College.  He previously had worked with the Northborough police for three years as fulltime dispatcher and then put himself through the police academy in Boylston.  He has been a Southborough dispatcher and has done community policing and filling open shifts in town.  Has been covering for Officer Henderson who has been out on injury since March of 2010.  Mr. Woodford has his home in Southborough.  He started as an explorer with the police department which started his career in police work.  Selectmen Boland asked Mr. Woodford  if he had a situation in his life if he would he could do it over in his life.  Mr. Woodford responded that he would have liked to have remained in school to receive his last three credits but had to come home for a family illness.  Selectman Rooney asked to describe what type of police officer you want to be.  Mr. Woodford said he is always trying to take on a little more responsibility every day.  Proactive and big believer in community policing.  He also asked how he would handle an irate person.  Talking is best to help diffuse a situation according to Mr. Woodford.  One word to describe himself: Dedicated.

Second candidate interviewed was Michael Whelan.  His interest started at a young age; His father is an officer on the Carlisle Police Department.  He graduated from University of Hartford in Criminal Justice.  He got into the police academy versus going into the Coast Guard.  He would like to be a Southborough police department member as he had heard that it is a great place to live and work.  Mr. Whelan’s answer to what he would have changed.  Selectmen Kolenda asked what would differentiate him from the others.  His answer was that he interacts very well with others.  Mr. Rooney asked what type of police officer he would like to be.  He would like to work with community residents and it is not all about chasing the bad guys but that he would be athletic enough to do so. One word to describe himself: Helpful.

Third candidate was Aaron Richardson.  Mr. Richardson grew up in the city of Boston and graduated through the METCO program.  He had done reserve police work in the town of Sherborn.  He has done research on the town of Southborough and would like to become a member of the community.  Mr. Richardson seemed to surprise the Selectmen at how thorough he had researched the town including the Board of Selectmen.  Dan Kolenda asked what he could bring to the town that would separate him from the rest of the candidates.  Mr. Richardson feels his academy training has been the best and best qualifies him.  Mr. Rooney told him that his honesty is refreshing.  He wanted to know what type of police officer he would be.  He is strong, very committed and dedicated. Would love to work with kids and community.  He would like to become more involved with community groups.  In one word describe yourself: active.  Police work is his passion; Corrections department is more negative as a career was the answer to Mr. Boland’s question on career paths.

Next up was Mr. James Gallagher.  He has an associate’s degree in Criminal Justice, seven years with the town of Norfolk as dispatcher and the past four as a part time police officer.  The main things that attracted him to Southborough were its location, similarities to Norfolk with its size and regional school and an easy transition from the town he currently works in to Southborough.  Mr. Boland asked why he is the best candidate.  Mr. Gallagher says he is positive, put himself through the academy, dedicated and has been working hard at pursuing a police career.  The answer to what he would have done over in his life time was he would have spent more time going to college for his bachelor degree vs. an associate’s degree.  One word that describes himself: dedicated.   He would work his hardest to make the town proud of him.  Mr. Boland asked what he found discouraging with someone in police work that he has seen.  The discouraging part is young officers that burn out at a young age and are not go getters anymore.  He has seen many officers that have been on the job for years and still go out and do the job and more and he respects that and would like to be like them.

The last candidate for the night to be interviewed was Thomas Rock.  He is a graduate in Criminal Justice from Westfield State.  He has worked for the Natick labs and as UMASS Worcester medical School.  He was sponsored in the academy through a Westborough officer.  He is very familiar with the town having grown up in Westborough and having family and assisting his dad with his landscaping business in town.  Selectmen Kolenda asked what would help separate Mr. Rock from the rest of the candidates.  He is quick to learn things and learn from his mistakes and never repeat them.  He is well rounded and has lots of experiences thinking on his feet.  Mr. Rooney asked what type of police officer would he be.  Mr. Rock responded by being fair and giving people the benefit of doubt and he is very patient.  The one word that would describe him is: Fair.  Mr. Boland asked what negatives or positives that he has seen in his career.   Mr. Rock said he witnessed one officer addressing a person that had a mental issue and didn't understand what was happening and the initial officer made the situation worse but a more junior officer interceded to change the outcome to a better path.

After deliberation, the Selectmen chose the three candidates.  They are William Woodward III, Aaron Richardson and Thomas Rock.  Selectmen were impressed with all the candidates.

In other business the Selectmen discussed and voted on where the new fire chief would live.  State statue requires police and fire chiefs to live within fifteen miles of the town employed.  The town can require that they live in the community or like with Police Chief Moran the requirement was to live within a town fully within the fifteen miles.  Mr. Rooney would like to see the next fire chief live similar distance as the police chief.  The mileage will become part of the advertisement for fire chief.  Mr. Boland moved that the next fire chief will have to live within a community that is wholly within the fifteen miles.

The metrowest regional collaborative recently had their dinner and they updated the Selectmen Boland and former Planning chair Charles Gaffney what their agenda will be for the coming year. 

Mr. Rooney asked that the Advisory Committee website be linked with the Southborough Town website.  Mr. Boland asked the assistant town manager if there were problems in the past that prevented the link from appearing on the town website.  More research has to be done before a link is sanctioned.

Marlborough to Receive $900,000 in Federal Block Grants

BOSTON - July 7, 2011 -Governor Deval Patrick today announced that 41 cities and towns across the Commonwealth will receive $28 million in federal Community Development Block Grants (CDBG). This funding will support housing, infrastructure, business development and public services projects, with Marlborough to receive $900,000 for housing rehabilitation and road and sidewalk repair. 

“These grants will allow communities to put people to work while moving forward on a multitude of improvement projects that will attract businesses to the Commonwealth,” said Governor Patrick who made the announcement following a neighborhood tour of improvements to Chelsea made possible by past CDBG funds. “Funding that allows cities and towns to fix up homes and storefronts, continue to provide public services or replace streets and sidewalks will strengthen Massachusetts and provide important opportunities to residents and businesses.”

 I am pleased that we have this opportunity to support the local community and the citizens of Marlborough by making a significant and much needed investment in affordable housing and infrastructure”, said Rep. Steven Levy (R-Marlborough).

The CDBG program is the Commonwealth’s largest available resource for neighborhood revitalization projects and helps meet the housing and public service needs of low- and moderate-incomeommunities while building and repairing infrastructure vital to the health and safety of all residents. The infrastructure projects help communities create and maintain jobs while providing important improvements to the lives of residents in each city and town. Historically, 40 percent of CDBG funds distributed have been used for these job-creating projects.

The program is administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and funds are distributed by the state Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) to cities and towns in Massachusetts with populations of less than 50,000. Eligible communities with populations greater than 50,000 receive program funding directly from HUD. Communities may apply for CDBG funding for activities including: housing rehabilitation projects, infrastructure repair or replacement, construction or rehabilitation of public facilities, neighborhood improvement projects, economic development loans and other business assistance programs, social service upgrades, downtown improvement projects and architectural barrier removal and planning. The maximum grant for a single community is $1 million. Regional applications are accepted

Did you know that there are so many neat Music Venues around New England?

http://indianranch.com/

http://www.meadowbrook.net/   (mostly country but much more)

Comcast Center Mansfield, ma

http://www.mechanicshall.org/

http://www.themusiccircus.org/

http://www.livenation.com/Bank-of-America-Pavilion-tickets-Boston/venue/8310

Tangle wood

Boston Symphony Orchestra

Boston Pops

http://www.newportjazzfest.net/

http://www.newenglandfolknetwork.org/coffee.html

http://www.newenglandfolknetwork.org/festivals.html

folk sessions and jamming

The Willows at Westborough’s 24th Annual FREE Summer Concert Series is underway!

Join us Wednesday evenings at 7:15 p.m. in the Rose Garden Courtyard at The Willows at Westborough through August 10th to hear the sweet sounds of live music from popular area musical groups. Coming up: Westwood Swing Band on July 13th; John Penny Band on July 20th; Tom Nutile Big Band on July 27th; Wolverine Jazz Band on August 3rd; and Stone Street Strummers on August 10th. 

Bring your family and friends with chairs or a blanket (leave pets at home, please); refreshments are available for purchase, and donations can be made to benefit area non-profit organizations. Note: In case of rain, inside seating will be exclusively for Willows’ residents and their guests. We hope to see you there.

Sports and Recreation

ARHS Sports Photos by Chris Wraight www.thawkspix.com

Southborough resident Dustin Weigl, a professional triathlete, competed in the 3rd Marlborough Triathlon today (Jul 10).  He came in 10th overall, 3rd in his division with a time of 1:10:54.