editor@southboroughnews.com

Page 1Page 2

Archived Page 193

January 30, 2011 - February 5, 2011

Not Ready

February 5, 2011 - Under all that snow where the tops of the fence posts are lies the Southborough Community Gardens.

 

Auction

 

Pilgrim Church Southborough will be hosting a Silent Auction on March 20th 2011 to benefit the mission trips program.   They have awesome Red Sox tickets, and Patriots pre-season tickets and Cape/vacation homes (for a week) as well as gift cards for local businesses.   This year they have 38 teens and 9 adult chaperons going to the Chicago area to work in food pantries, homeless shelters, soup kitchens and with local churches in need of repairs to their food pantries.  

Winter weather advisory remains in effect until 10 pm est this evening,
A winter weather advisory remains in effect until 10 pm est this evening.
Locations, southwest and south central Massachusetts as well as portions of northern Connecticut and northern Rhode Island.
Hazard types, brief period of snow and sleet at midday followed by freezing rain this afternoon and possibly into early this evening.
Accumulations, up to 1 inch of snow followed by a glaze of ice accretion up to a tenth of an inch.
Timing, light spotty wintry precipitation has already overspread the region at midday and will become more widespread as the afternoon progresses.
Impacts, untreated roads will become slippery this afternoon and evening.
Winds, southeast up to 5 mph will become northeast.
Temperatures, upper 20s to lower 30s.
Precautionary/preparedness actions,
A winter weather advisory is issued when snow and/or ice is forecast to develop in the affected areas, but accumulations are expected to be light. Any snow or ice would make driving and walking difficult, but not impossible, on untreated roadways and sidewalks. When temperatures are below freezing, motorists need to be especially careful on bridges and overpasses where slippery spots can easily develop.
 

Memory WalkersMA/NH Essential E-news
 
February 2011



 

 
 

In the News...

Alzheimer's called "defining disease" of baby boomers. CNN
Join Us for Alzheimer Action Day Feb 7
MA State House 
Put down your snow shovel and pick up the cause. Join with us at the State House in Boston to ask our legislators to support quality of care for those with Alzheimer's. It's one morning -- to make a difference.
 
Monday, February 7 - 10 a.m.-noon
Grand Staircase / Mass State House, Boston
For more information or to register, contact Jennifer Carter or call 617.868.6718. Or click on the State House and let us know we can count on you!

On the Cutting Edge of Alzheimer's

the Search for Answers

Special 30th Anniversary Research Forum

Early Recognition and Progression of Alzheimer's: a presentation by three of the nation's leading researchers

Moderated by Maria C. Carrillo, PhD, Senior Director, Medical & Scientific Relations, National Alzheimer's Association

Wednesday, March 31, 2011, 7:00 p.m.

National Heritage MuseumLexington, MA

Free and open to the public. Seating is limited.

Click to reserve your seat or call 617.868.6718 

It's the Walk to End Alzheimer's ... Click! 

WALK 11 postcard 
Click on the postcard for the latest on the 2011 Walk. Find the Walk nearest you and plan to be part of the movement to end Alzheimer's!

New Skills Series for Caregivers

Essential Skills for Alzheimer's Care: It Starts with Communication (Watertown, MA)

Alzheimer's Association, 311 Arsenal Street, 4th Floor

Secifically designed with family caregivers in mind (no professional caregivers please).  Pre-registration is required.

Wednesday, February 16, 10:00 am - 12:00 pm, Click here  to register online. 

Monday, February 28, 6:00 - 8:00 pm, Click here to register online.

Meet Volunteer David Banks, Pembroke, MA
David Banks

Why did you become a  volunteer? As with many others, neurodegenerative illness had touched my family including a member with Alzheimer's. As a professional, I have always worked with those who had unique life challenges. Blending both through volunteerism has been my passion.

 

What do you do? I'm active with the local South Shore Alzheimer's Partnership, serving as co-chair for 10 years. I helped establish the Partnership which has held successful annual educational conferences and built the care assistance grant program. I have also presented Early Stage programs and have spoken to groups for the Association.

How long have you been a volunteer? 15 years

What do you like best about volunteering?

The feeling that you contribute positively to assisting those in your region and state with the challenges presented by the disease.

Help, Delivered 24/7
 

Feeling snowbound? Isolated?  Help is available from the warmth of your own living room! Remember our 24/7 Helpline is there for you 24 hours a day, seven days a week for any kind of question, but also for some friendly support.

If you are more apt to do things online, you can access the Helpline online or read up on what's in the news as well as get general information. You can even join in group support with our telephone support group. All this and you don't even need to shovel! From MA and NH, CAll 800.272.3900.

Getting Started

Getting Started: What to Do When Your Family Member Has Memory Loss provides an overview of Alzheimer's for families who have a loved one with memory loss. Topics: getting a diagnosis, behavior and communication problems, local resources, and more. Group size may be limited. Program is free of charge. For more information, call 800.272.3900.

Lebanon, NH

Wednesday, February 16, 6:00 - 8:30 p.m.

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Aging Resource Center, 46 Centerra Parkway, 2nd Floor. Call 603-606-6590 to register

Springfield, MA

Tuesday, February 22, 5:00 - 7:00 p.m.

Alzheimer's Association, 264 Cottage Street. Click here to register.

Athol, MA

Tuesday, March 8, 4:00 - 6:30 pm

North Quabbin Adult Day Health Center, 1471 Main Street Rear

Click here Click here to register. 

Join us online for news, views and more!
Find us on Facebook
Join Our Mailing List 
Coping With Early Memory Loss

Coping with Early Memory Loss: for individuals recently diagnosed with memory loss, their family and friends.

February 16th

 3:30-5:30 p.m.

Alzheimer's Association 

311 Arsenal Street 

Watertown

March 7th

10:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

  Worcester Senior Center 128 Providence Street

Registration required.

Call 617.393.2005 or e-mail Nicole McGurin.  

 
Stay warm, go Purple
purple run hat
Runners, and everyone trying to stay warm...check out the caps, gloves and running shirts. Support the cause, go purple and stay warm!  Click on the photo!
Purple Heirloom 
Purple Quilt
An instant heirloom, "Fractured Amethyst" -- this beautiful handcrafted quilt is being raffled to raise money for the cause. Click on the quilt to learn more!
Apply to RUN
RFTM - BRTR Logo
Do you run? Know someone who does? The Alzhimer's Association will have a Run to Remember team. Click on the logo to sign-up/learn more.
NH Monarchs Feb. 19th

Join the Alzheimer's Association and the Manchester Monarchs on Sunday, February 19th for a fun-filled night that will benefit the Alzheimer cause. Click for tickets.  

Our Vision:  a world without Alzheimer's disease.

311 Arsenal Street, Watertown, MA 02472
regional offices:
Raynham, Springfield and Worcester, MA and Bedford and Lebanon, NH
617.868.6718  MA |  603.606.6590 NH | 800.272.3900 24/7 Helpline
Alzheimer's Association, Massachusetts/New Hampshire Chapter
Neighboring Town has Roof Problems

February 4, 2011 - www.hopnews.com has been reporting all the roof collapses that have occurred in Hopkinton over the past week.  Today the roof on this horse barn collapsed.  Fortunately the two horses were able to be led out safely from their bottom floor stall area.  Other collapses in town were at the Hopkinton DPW barn, a private garage and a greenhouse at Weston Nurseries.  Last week not far from Hopkinton the old Glen Maura indoor Riding ring on Olive Street collapsed.

Public Safety Advisory

On Potential Roof Collapses

Dangers Associated With Heavy Snow Loads on Roofs

Over the past 36 hours, there have been over 70 reports of roof collapses or buildings with potential structural damage from the weight of snow and ice loads on roofs.  While these incidents have occurred throughout the Commonwealth, the majority have taken place in eastern Massachusetts.  In many instances, homes and businesses have been evacuated as a result of collapses or safety concerns resulting from indications of structural weaknesses.  In a normal winter season, there may be a handful of such events, making this season, with its heavy snowfall, extremely unique.  The current severe roof load conditions are the result of the recent prolonged cold weather and repeated snowstorms.  Short periods of rain that get absorbed in the snowpack on roofs have also made matters even worse.  Compounding the situation is the short-term weather forecast of potentially two more snowstorms in the next week.

Homeowners, tenants, and businesses need to be cognizant of the danger posed by heavy snow loads on roofs, and the warning signs of potential structural weaknesses.  In some instances, the risks posed by accumulated snow on roofs can be mitigated by safely removing snow from roofs of both commercial buildings and homes.  Because temperatures are expected to remain cold for at least the next few days, and more snow may fall as early as this weekend, efforts should be undertaken now to safely remove snow from roofs. 

Removing snow from rooftops will minimize the likelihood of structural collapse.

Flat and low pitched roofs, most often found on industrial buildings, but are also used in certain home designs, are at the greatest risk of buckling under heavy snow and ice accumulations.

Removing snow from rooftops will minimize the likelihood of structural collapse.

Flat and low pitched roofs, most often found on industrial buildings, but are also used in certain home designs, are at the greatest risk of buckling under heavy snow and ice accumulations.

 

Lower roofs, where snow drifts or accumulates from higher roofs are also vulnerable.  Some potential signs of imminent roof collapse.

 

 

 

Tips for Homeowners in removing snow and ice from roofs and other areas

·         DO’s

·         Use a snow rake for pitched roofs (available at most hardware stores) to remove snow from your roof.

·         Start from the edge and work your way into the roof.

·         Try to shave the snow down to a 2 or 3 inches on the roof instead of scraping the roof clean, which will risk damage to your shingles or other roof covering.

Keep in mind that any metal tool could conduct electricity if it touches a power line.

Also, metal tools will do more damage to your roof.

Shovel snow from flat roofs throwing the snow over the side away from the building. 

Most plastic shovels are better, except for the ones with curved blades—those too will do some damage to your roof.

·         Remove large icicles carefully if they're hanging over doorways and walkways.  Consider knocking down icicles through windows using a broom stick.

·         Wear protective headgear and goggles when performing any of these tasks.

·         Consider hiring professionals to do the job. The combination of heights plus ice makes this one of the more dangerous house chores.

·         If you don't hire professionals, at least have someone outside with you in case anything does go wrong

·        Keep gutters, and drains clean, free of ice and snow and keep downspouts clean at ground level.

Tips for Homeowners in removing snow and ice from roofs and other areas

·         DON’T’s

·         Unless approved by a registered professional engineer, don’t add your weight or the weight of equipment to the roof.

·         Don’t use a ladder since ice tends to build up on both the rungs of the ladder and the soles of your boots.

·         Don’t use electric heating devices like hair dryers or heat guns to remove snow and ice.

·         Don’t use open-flame devices to remove snow and ice.

According to Meteorologist Tony Petrarca, a cubic foot of dry snow weighs about seven pounds, while a cubic foot of wet snow weighs anywhere from 12 to 18 pounds. So, if it's possible, hire someone to help with all of the snow clearing.

How to Recognize Problems with Roofs

·         Sagging roofs

·         Severe roof leaks

·         Cracked or split wood members

·         Bends or ripples in supports

·         Cracks in walls or masonry

·         Sheared off screws from steel frames

·         Sprinkler heads that have dropped down below ceiling tiles

·         Doors that pop open

·         Doors or windows that are difficult to open

·         Bowed utility pipes or conduit attached at ceiling

·         Creaking, cracking or popping sounds

Other Safety Tips for Homeowners

·         Make sure you smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors are working.

·         Check your outside fuel and dryer exhaust vents, making sure that they are not obstructed by snow or ice. Never use cooking equipment intended for outside use indoors as a heat source or cooking device. Never use your oven for heat.

·         Clear snow away from furnace and dryer exhaust vents to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning.

·         Space heaters need space, so use them in a 3-foot circle of safety; free of anything that catch fire. Space heaters are not designed to replace your central heating system; they are only designed to provide a little extra heat on a temporary basis. So be sure to turn them off when you leave room or go to bed at night.

·         Clear snow away from downspouts so water has a place to go.

·         Do not be tempted to use a heat gun or open flame torch to melt the ice; the risk of starting a fire is huge.

·         If you feel you are in immediate danger, get outside and call 9-1-1.

Tips for businesses in removing snow and ice from roofs and other areas

·         DO’s

·         The same tips apply.  However, if you are going to use a snow blower, make sure that it has been approved by a structural engineer to be used on a roof, and that the blower is set to a high level above the roof so as not to damage roof membrane.

·         Use a snow rake for pitched roofs (available at most hardware stores) to remove snow from your roof.

·         Start from the edge and work your way into the roof.

·         Try to shave the snow down to a 2 or 3 inches on the roof instead of scraping the roof clean, which will risk damage to your shingles or other roof covering.

Keep in mind that any metal tool could conduct electricity if it touches a power line.

Also, metal tools will do more damage to your roof.

Shovel snow from flat roofs throwing the snow over the side away from the building.

Most plastic shovels are better, except for the ones with curved blades—those too will do some damage to your roof.

·         Remove large icicles carefully if they're hanging over doorways and walkways.

·         Wear protective headgear and goggles when performing any of these tasks.

·        Keep gutters, downspouts and drains clean.

How to Recognize Problems with Roofs in Commercial Buildings

·         Many of the same apply - added

·         Sagging roof steel – visually deformed

·         Severe roof leaks

·         Cracked or split wood members

·         Bends or ripples in metal supports

·         Cracks in walls or masonry

·         Cracks in welds of steel construction

·         Sheared off screws from steel frames

·         Sprinkler heads pushed down below ceiling tiles

·         Water puddles where it never has before

·         Doors that pop open

·         Doors or windows that are difficult to open

·         Bowed utility pipes or conduit attached at ceiling

·         Creaking, cracking or popping sounds

·          

What to do if you have problems

·                                 Call your local building or fire official.

·                                 If there is imminent danger, evacuate the building and call 911.

What other assistance is available?

·         Many fire departments have regional technical rescue teams available to local departments in case of collapse.

·         Massachusetts Task Force 1 is an Urban Search and Rescue Team in Beverly.  The team is comprised of Police, Fire, EMS and Civilians who respond to major disasters under a contract with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Currently there are 150 people on the MATF-1 team.

Having trouble viewing this email? Click here
logo with tag line


 
A Celtic Celebration
with The Kerry Boys
Forward to a Friend 
Friday, February 25, 2010
7:30 pm
 Hudson Town Hall,
78 Main Street, Hudson
 Adults: $12 Students:$10
Children under 12: $8
Purchase in advance and save $1

To purchase tickets visit: www.upwitharts.org
 

or call: 978.562.1646

 

 

Space Weather News for Feb. 4, 2011
http://spaceweather.com

GEOMAGNETIC STORM: A solar wind stream hit Earth during the late hours of Feb. 4th, sparking a G2-class (Kp=6) geomagnetic storm.  Sky watchers in Scandinavia, Russia, Canada, Alaska and perhaps even northern-tier US states such as Maine, Minnesota and Wisconsin, should be alert for auroras on Friday night.  The best time to look is during the hours around local midnight.

SPACE WEATHER ALERTS:  Would you like a phone call when geomagnetic storms erupt?  Sign up for Space Weather Phone: http://spaceweatherphone.com (New: A text version of the alert service is now available.  Check out http://spaceweathertext.com )
 

Sports and Recreation

February 9 – Natural History of New England Cottontails, Barnstable As part of the Cape Wildlife Center's winter speaker series, Dave Paulson, MassWildlife biologist, will talk about the natural history of the New England Cottontail. The free talk is at 6:30pm at the Wildlife Center's facility at 4011 Main Street (Rte 6A), Barnstable Village. For more information, call the Center at (508) 362-0111 or www.humanesociety.org/cape.

February 10-13 – Eastern Fishing and Outdoor Exposition, Worcester This annual show is held at the DCU Centre in Worcester. DFW staff will be on hand to sell licenses and offer recreation information.  More information about the show is at www.sportshows.com or call (603) 431-4315.

February 12 – Merrimack River Eagle Festival, Newburyport/Amesbury – A free, full day of outdoor and indoor activities celebrating Bald Eagles sponsored by MassAudubon and the US Fish & Wildlife Service. Watch eagles from viewing hot spots, see a falconer with a live eagle, enjoy nature games and activities indoors.  Visit DFW’s Biologist Pat Huckery at the Chain Bridge who will be scanning the skies and ice floes for eagles! Call MassAudubon at 978-462-9998 or go to www.massaudubon.org/Nature_Connection/Sanctuaries/Joppa_Flats

February 16 – Living With Coyotes, Nahant – A talk on coyotes will be presented by DFW's Laura Hajduk, Furbearer Biologist, by invitation of the Nahant Board of Selectmen. A question and answer period will follow. Information will include coyote behavior and natural history as well as tips on keeping pets safe and keeping coyotes wary of people. The talk will begin at 7 pm at the Nahant Town Hall, 334 Nahant Road.

February 24 –27 – Springfield Sportsmen’s Show, West Springfield – DFW staff will be on hand to sell licenses and offer information on the Angler and Hunter Education programs and wildlife -related recreation. Information on the show is at:  www.osegsportsmens.com/html/springfield.html.

All Shoveled

February 3, 2011 -  The Trottier roof was shoveled off earlier today.

Plenty of Snow Around

February 3, 2011 - St. Matthew's Church on Highland Street is all tucked in with snow and ice.  The youth group will be collecting soup this weekend during Super bowl weekend.

Algonquin Regional High School looking for a new Assistant

Assistant Superintendent of Schools

The Northborough – Southborough Union #3 and the Northborough-Southborough Regional School District are seeking a dynamic educational leader to work with the Superintendent in the areas of curriculum, instruction, personnel, and finances, beginning July 1, 2011.  Candidates must be licensed (or eligible for licensure) as a Superintendent/Assistant Superintendent in Massachusetts.  Candidates should have a minimum of a Master’s Degree and at least three years leadership experience in an educational setting.  A detailed job description is available upon request. Salary for this position will be competitive, depending upon experience.

Qualified applicants need to submit, by 4 p.m. February 18, 2011, a cover letter which describes experiences, education, and other qualifications for this position, a current resume, three (3) recent letters of recommendation, all undergraduate and graduate transcripts, and a photocopy of Massachusetts licensure to:

Charles E. Gobron, Ed.D.

Superintendent of Schools

Northborough-Southborough Public Schools

53 Parkerville Road

Southborough, MA  01772

For more information Click here

Sent by: National Heritage Museum
Reply to the sender
Forward to a friend
Get Your Free Tickets at the Museum Today!
USAF Band of Liberty's Colonial Brass Quintet
USAF Band of Liberty's Colonial Brass Quintet
 
Air Force Band of Liberty's Colonial Brass Quintet
Saturday, February 5, 2011 at 2 pm

The United States Air Force Band of Liberty's Colonial Brass Quintet will be in concert at the Museum Saturday, February 5 at 2 pm. The program will present music from 19th-century Italy, elegant classics, bebop, and toe-tapping march tunes. Composers range from Rossini and Prokofiev to Dizzy Gillespie and George Gershwin.

Free, but tickets are required. To reserve tickets, drop by the front desk during Museum business hours or call (781) 861-6559, ext. 4101.

Concert program:

L’italiana in Algeri
Gioacchino Rossini (1792-1868)

Spanish Waltz
G.H. Green (1892-1939)

Suite from “Lieutenant Kije”
Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953)

The Circus Bee March
Henry Fillmore (1881-1958)

Chromatic Foxtrot
G.H. Green (1892-1939)

An American in Paris
George Gershwin (1898-1937)

Con Alma
Dizzie Gillespie (1917-1993)

The Colonial Brass features talented musicians with extensive experience in civilian and military bands and orchestras throughout the United States and abroad. The ensemble utilizes a wide variety of music to entertain audiences of all ages. They have appeared at prestigious venues such as Tanglewood, MENC (Music Educators National Conference), and the New York Brass Conference. The creativity and professionalism of the Colonial Brass inspires audiences wherever they perform.

Winter Hours Now in Effect
Through May 3, 2011

A reminder that the Museum is now operating on a winter hours schedule now through May 3, 2011. The Museum is open Wednesday through Saturday, from 10 am–4:30 pm, and is closed Sunday through Tuesday. Admission remains free.

Fan Us on Facebook!

Facebook is an easy way to stay current with Museum events and news. Please take a moment to fan us by clicking here, and help us spread the word about all our great exhibitions and programs!

Follow Us on Twitter!

If you enjoy Twitter, please follow the Museum! Yet another easy way we can keep you up to date.

National Heritage Museum
33 Marrett Road
Lexington, MA 02421
781-861-6559
www.nationalheritagemuseum.org
Free admission and parking
Winter Hours Schedule in Effect:
Wednesday through Saturday, 10 am–4:30 pm

Closed Sunday through Tuesday

The Museum was founded by and is supported by the Scottish Rite Freemasons.

Be sure to check out our blogs! The National Heritage Museum Blog is a great resource for information on American history, Freemasonry, Fraternalism, and Museum news. Our Learning Blog facilitates the use of primary sources to reconstruct the past.

Having trouble viewing this email? Click here
 
 

ALL FRESH FLOWERS ARE NOT THE SAME!

We've heard the expression:  "A rose is a rose." Well, when it comes to actual roses, or for that matter fresh flowers in general--not really.  All fresh flowers are not the same.  

 

So, what's the difference?  Or to put it in terms of a frequently asked question at Gulbankian's:  "Whenever I purchase flowers from you, how come they last so long?" Here's the answer:

 

Cut, shipped and delivered to us daily, our fresh flowers receive proper loving care and immediate attention.  We only sell Grade #1 flowers, which means that they are "the best and farm fresh".  

 

So, why not let our quality fresh flowers grace your special occasions or "just because"events & help create wonderful memories.  You'll get a great value for your dollar and a warm feeling that you've brightened somebody's day!

 Order quality fresh flowers or pick some up today!

 

 Pink tulipsTeleflora Valentine Agmt.Pink Roses in Vase

     
Gulbankian Farms Garden Center & Florist Shop
40 Mt. Vickery Rd. Southborough, MA 01772
Tel:  508-485-8979
 
Sports and Recreation
Upcoming Clinic

Contributed photo:  Dylan Foley, Algonquin Varsity Wrestling 2011.

2011 ALGONQUIN YOUTH WRESTLING CLINICS at Algonquin Regional High School, 79 Bartlett St., Northborough, March 1 - April 7 (12 sessions), Tues. and Thurs. 6:30pm-8:00pm. For 4th-8th graders. No previous experience necessary. Through high energy, fun-filled sessions your child will learn amateur wrestling techniques as well as develop balance, flexibility, coordination, body awareness and self-confidence. Sessions will be run by the Algonquin High School Coach Staff, including Coach Adam Quitt, Clinic Director and Algonquin Wrestling Head Coach, and Varsity Standouts. For more information contact Katarina Wrin at wrink6@aol.com  or 508-879-0001.

Winter Scavenger Hunt
Sponsored by Drumlin Farm

Tue, Feb 08, 2011 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Instructor: Drumlin Farm Staff - '
Audience: Family (suitable for children ages 4 - 10 yrs)
Fee: Adults $8.00m/ $10.00nm, Children $8.00m/ $10.00nm
Registration is required.

Keep your eyes and ears open for the smaller signs of winter. Join us as we follow the trails of voles or mice beneath the snow, and look for signs of larger animals like deer and rabbits... and don't forget to bring along your flashlight to help you look into the corners and crevices of the barn!

Up to three children per adult. Fees apply to all participants, both adults and children. "Backpack babies" (under 12 months and carried in a backpack or sling) are welcome free of charge, but please mention these participants when registering.


Things You Should Know:

-Drumlin Farm Wildlife Sanctuary is a dynamic environment. Occasionally we may make programmatic changes to take advantage of new opportunities or to maintain the safety of the visitors and the animals we care for.

-Children should be the age indicated by the start of each program.

-Programs include time indoors, as well as outside, and will run rain or shine; please come dressed comfortably for our outdoor adventures! If severe weather occurs please call our cancellation line by dialing 781-259-2200 (then press 2, then 3). If your program is not mentioned, it will take place as scheduled.

-In programs where there is a farm to food connection, snacks from the farm may be incorporated.

Instructions and Directions: Please check in at the Admissions Window to find out where your class will meet. Program will include some time indoors as well as outdoors, and will run rain or shine; please come dressed comfortably for our outdoor adventures!


Register by mail: program registration form. (PDF 66K)
Register by phone: with a credit card by calling 781-259-2200.
For your own security, DO NOT send credit card information via email.


For more information, contact:

Drumlin Farm
208 South Great Road
Lincoln, MA 01773
drumlinfarm@massaudubon.org

View this email in a web browser

Mass audubon's Focus on Feeders

Focus on Feeders Weekend is Almost Here!
February 5th and 6th, 2011

Take part in the fun of discovering the variety and number of birds
dining in backyards across Massachusetts!

Harry_Becker_cedarwaxwing
2010 Best Overall Photo
A Visual Feast by Harry Becker

Participating in
Focus on Feeders is easy:

  • Count the highest number of each bird species seen together in your backyard and feeders at any one time.
  • Report your observations on our online report form.
  • Or, record your observations on an official Focus on Feeders Report Form and mail your report form to Mass Audubon.

Ask your friends and neighbors to join the fun! The more data we collect, the more we know about the winter birds of Massachusetts.

PLUS - everyone who reports their bird sightings will be entered in a drawing to win prizes, including Mass Audubon backpacks and more!

Get your camera ready!

Focus on Feeders will once again include a photo contest, and we will award prizes in several categories for wildlife photographs submitted with bird observations. New this year: Upload your photos online starting February 5.

Thank you for your help!

View previous years results and winning photos.

http://web.massaudubon.org/site/PixelServer?j=ZyWO8quaGdiWfyQ0zqPzQQ..


Mass Audubon
208 South Great Road
Lincoln, MA 01773
781-259-9500 / 800-AUDUBON
http://www.massaudubon.org/


This message was originally sent to metrowestcowgirl@verizon.net: Unsubscribe.
Send this issue of Focus on Feeders to a friend or colleague.

Received Focus on Feeders from a friend? Subscribe.

 

 Trottier School Closed

Thursday February 3 Trottier Middle School will be closed for removal of snow from the roof.

Capital Budget Planning Committee - Agenda - CANCELLED Feb 2 6:30 pm Small conference room, Town House
Council on Aging - Agenda - CANCELLED Feb 2 7:00 pm Country Kitchen, Cordaville Hall, 9 Cordaville Road
Roof Problem

February 2, 2011 - Southborough Fire Department responded to alarms at the Trottier Middle School and found that there might be a problem with the roof.  Town officials, Facility Managers and School officials were notified and responded to the site.  No further update on the condition of the roof.  Meanwhile, Southborough Fire responded to a mutual aid call to a confirmed building collapse at the UPS building at 203 Flanders Road in Westborough.  There has been a rash of commercial building collapses this week and especially with today,s weather.

Graupel

February 2, 2011 - A blast of Graupel came through on the heels of today's storm.  It is also called small hail, soft hail, or snow pellets.

Winter weather advisory in effect until 1 am est Thursday.
The NWS in taunton has issued a winter weather advisory for freezing drizzle and snow, which is in effect until 1 am est Thursday.
Locations, all of southern new england except the cape and islands.
Hazard types, freezing drizzle and snow
Accumulations, ice accumulations less than one quarter of an inch and snow accumulations 1 to 3 inches.
Timing, freezing drizzle should continue through about 10 pm. Light snow will start falling between 8 and 10 pm and come to an end between 1 and 2 am.
Impacts, precipitation from earlier today and continuing freezing drizzle will freeze on exposed areas, resulting in slippery roads and sidewalks. Then an inch or two of snow on top of that will further contribute to slick roads.
Precautionary/preparedness actions,
A winter weather advisory is issued when snow and/or ice is forecast to develop in the affected areas, but accumulations are expected to be light. Any snow or ice would make driving and walking difficult, but not impossible, on untreated roadways and sidewalks. When temperatures are below freezing, motorists need to be especially careful on bridges and overpasses where slippery spots can easily develop.
 

Clean Up

February 2, 2011 - Clean up took a variety of ways in this storm.

Assabet Valley Tech

February 2, 2011 - The team played Blackstone Valley Technical School Monday night.

No School Wednesday Feb 2, 2011

Algonquin Regional High School

Southborough K - 8

The Public Schools of Northborough and Southborough will be closed
Wednesday, February 2, 2011 because of the snowstorm and the difficult driving conditions.

Assabet Valley Regional Technical High School

Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011: School is cancelled due to the storm. All athletic events, evening meetings and the Continuing Education classes are cancelled as well.

 

Norfolk County Agricultural High School

School will be Closed Wednesday, February 2nd All Activities are cancelled.
 

Another Nasty Day

February 1, 2011 - More treacherous driving with still another day of it to come.

Winter storm warning remains in effect until 1 am est thursday,
A winter storm warning remains in effect until 1 am est Thursday.
Locations, central Massachusetts, mainly near and south of the mass pike.
Hazard types, heavy snow, sleet and freezing rain.
Accumulations, 2 to 6 inches of snow with the highest amounts most likely near the Massachusetts turnpike. One to two tenths of an inch of glaze also possible.
Timing, areas of very light snow, sleet and freezing drizzle will continue this evening. Steady snow will redevelop between 1 and 5 am from west to east. The snow will be heavy at times during the morning commute, then will change to sleet and freezing rain by late morning. Its possible that the precipitation could change to all rain for a brief period in the afternoon. Any mixed precipitation will change back to light snow by evening before ending Wednesday night.
Impacts, moderate to heavy snow will impact the morning commute. Snowfall rates of 1 inch per hour are expected through mid morning resulting in very hazardous travel conditions. The heavy snow combined with one to two tenths of an inch of ice accumulation could further strain weaker structures and tree limbs. A few power lines may also be downed, resulting in isolated power outages.
Visibilities, one quarter mile or less at times.
Precautionary/preparedness actions,
A winter storm warning is issued when an average of 6 or more inches of snow is expected in a 12 hour period, or for 8 or more inches in a 24 hour period. Travel will be slow at best on well treated surfaces, and quite difficult on any unplowed or untreated surfaces.
 

Iced

February 1, 2011 - Icicles reach almost to the ground at St. Mathews Parish church.

Sent by: National Heritage Museum
Reply to the sender
Forward to a friend
Valentines, Colonial Brass Concert, and Model Trains!
 
To My True Love, 1920. Gift of Vivienne Kalman in Memory of Albert L. Kalman
To My True Love, 1920. Gift of Vivienne Kalman in Memory of Albert L. Kalman
 
Valentines from the Kalman Collection, 1910-1920
Through March 5, 2011


Romantic Valentine greetings have been popular as far back as the Middle Ages when lovers said or sang their verses to their sweeties. Today we are most familiar with the pretty paper variety. Each year, the Van Gorden-Williams Library presents a small but delightful display of antique Valentines from its collection. Smiling puppies and impish cherubs, lovely maidens and heartsick gentlemen, the characters on these charming cards convey their messages of love to sweethearts of long ago. Many of the cards on view stand up or feature moving parts, showing an inventiveness rarely seen in cards today.

This antique valentine collection originally belonged to Albert Kalman, who owned and managed Kimbal's Camera and Card shop in downtown Boston for 35 years. His wife, Vivienne, donated the collection in his memory. Each year, Mr. Kalman decorated his shop with these vintage cards to celebrate Valentine's Day. Visit us and carry on the tradition!
USAF Band of Liberty's Colonial Brass Quintet
USAF Band of Liberty's Colonial Brass Quintet
 
Air Force Band of Liberty's Colonial Brass Quintet
Saturday, February 5, 2011 at 2 pm

The United States Air Force Band of Liberty's Colonial Brass Quintet will be in concert at the Museum Saturday, February 5 at 2 pm. The program will present music from 19th-century Italy, elegant classics, bebop, and toe-tapping march tunes. Composers range from Rossini and Prokofiev to Dizzy Gillespie and George Gershwin.

Free, but tickets are required. To reserve tickets, drop by the front desk during Museum business hours or call (781) 861-6559, ext. 4101.

Concert program:

L’italiana in Algeri
Gioacchino Rossini (1792-1868)

Spanish Waltz
G.H. Green (1892-1939)

Suite from “Lieutenant Kije”
Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953)

The Circus Bee March
Henry Fillmore (1881-1958)

Chromatic Foxtrot
G.H. Green (1892-1939)

An American in Paris
George Gershwin (1898-1937

Con Alma
Dizzie Gillespie (1917-1993)

The Colonial Brass features talented musicians with extensive experience in civilian and military bands and orchestras throughout the United States and abroad. The ensemble utilizes a wide variety of music to entertain audiences of all ages. They have appeared at prestigious venues such as Tanglewood, MENC (Music Educators National Conference), and the New York Brass Conference. The creativity and professionalism of the Colonial Brass inspires audiences wherever they perform.

School Vacation Begins with Ntrak Model Trains!
Saturday, February 19 and Sunday, February 20, 2011

Start February School Vacation Week with a weekend filled with model railroading fun! The Northeast Ntrak Modular Railroad Club will be at the Museum on Saturday, February 19 from 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m., and Sunday, February 20 from noon-4:00 p.m. Admission to the train display is $7/family, but admission to the Museum is free.

The Ntrak trains are smaller in size than traditional model trains, but are just as much fun. Trains climb mountain passes, shunt freight cars, and use branch lines to pick up and set out cars at the many industries and stations along the way. Call the Museum for more information at 781-861-6559, ext 4101.

*Note--The Museum is changing its winter hours schedule for this event. The Museum WILL be open on Sunday, February 20.

Winter Hours Now in Effect
Winter Hours Now in Effect
Through May 3, 2011

A reminder that the Museum is now operating on a winter hours schedule now through May 3, 2011. The Museum is open Wednesday through Saturday, from 10 am–4:30 pm, and is closed Sunday through Tuesday. Admission remains free.

Fan Us on Facebook!

Facebook is an easy way to stay current with Museum events and news. Please take a moment to fan us by clicking here, and help us spread the word about all our great exhibitions and programs!

Follow Us on Twitter!

If you enjoy Twitter, please follow the Museum! Yet another easy way we can keep you up to date.

National Heritage Museum
33 Marrett Road
Lexington, MA 02421
781-861-6559
www.nationalheritagemuseum.org
Free admission and parking
Winter Hours Schedule in Effect:
Wednesday through Saturday, 10 am–4:30 pm

Closed Sunday through Tuesday

The Museum was founded by and is supported by the Scottish Rite Freemasons.

Be sure to check out our blogs! The National Heritage Museum Blog is a great resource for information on American history, Freemasonry, Fraternalism, and Museum news. Our Learning Blog facilitates the use of primary sources to reconstruct the past.
 

State Rep. Steven Levy, R-Marlboro, will hold office hours Friday. Hours and locations include: 10 to 11 a.m. at Lowe’s Variety Store, 19 Central St., Berlin; 11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. at Southboro House of Pizza, 5 Main St., Southboro; and 1 to 2 p.m., district office, Walker Building, Room 106, 255 Main St. Those unable to attend may contact his office at (617) 722-2425, ext. 7307, or e-mail robert.maurice@mahouse.gov to set up an appointment.
 

Sports and Recreation

Feb. 1, 2011

East Coast teams move into first place in men’s division at 2011 Junior Nationals

(STEVENS POINT, Wis.) – The East Coast teams competing under the monikers Massachusetts I and II shined in Tuesday’s action at the USA Curling Junior National Championships in Fairbanks, Alaska.

Teams skipped by Alex Leichter (Wayland, Mass.) and Stephen Dropkin (Southborough, Mass.) jockeyed their way into a four-way tie for first place in the men’s standings after picking up their fourth wins as the round robin continues at the Fairbanks Curling Club. The Massachusetts-based rinks are tied with Wisconsin’s teams skipped by John Landsteiner (Duluth, Minn.) and Tom Gabower (Janesville, Wis.), who is the youngest skip in the Junior Nationals field at age 15.

Leichter and teammates Chris Bond (Madison, Wis.), Nathaniel Clark (Nashua, N.H.), Jared Wydysh (Holland Patent, N.Y.) and alternate Donald Mackintosh (Niskayuna, N.Y.) got the better of Junior Nationals rookie Jake Vukich, 10-3, after jumping out quickly to a 7-1 lead after three ends of play. Dropkin’s team knocked Landsteiner’s Wisconsin I rink into the loss column for the first time in the tournament with a 7-6 win. Dropkin and teammates Korey Dropkin (Southborough, Mass.), Thomas Howell (Brick, N.J.) and Derek Corbett (Rochester, N.Y.) broke open a close match with a steal of two in the seventh end to take a 6-2 advantage. Landsteiner’s team scored three in the eighth and stole a single in the ninth to tie the game but Dropkin, 20, a seven-time Junior Nationals participant, scored a single in the 10th to improve to 4-1.

Gabower and teammates Daniel Brown (Winona, Minn.), Marcus Oldenburg (McFarland, Wis.), Mikey Juszczyk (McFarland, Wis.) and Devon Maier (Green Bay, Wis.) picked up their fourth win as well today with a 7-4 defeat of North Dakota I’s Evan Workin team. In the battle of the Minnesota teams, Aaron Wald (Chisholm, Minn.) handed Tyler Runing (North Mankato, Minn.) an 8-4 loss. Alaska’s Matt Birklid rink picked up a second straight win by scoring three points in the 10th end to defeat North Dakota II’s Adam Kitchens rink.

In women’s action this afternoon, Miranda Solem’s Minnesota I team remains perfect at 5-0 and alone in first place as Solem and teammates Miranda Schieber (Portage, Wis.), Julie Lilla (Trempealeau, Wis.) and Chelsea Solem (Cohasset, Minn.) stole seven straight points against Wisconsin II’s Hannah Elko en route to a 9-2 win. Right behind Minnesota, in what should be a key game on Thursday for playoff seeding, Wisconsin I’s Becca Hamilton rink only needed five ends to earn the team’s fourth win as they poured on the offense against Katlyn Beebe’s rink from New York in a 12-1 victory.

MacKenzie Lank (Lewiston, N.Y.) helped her North Dakota-based team to its third win with a 7-6 defeat of the hometown team led by Vicky Persinger (Fairbanks, Alaska). Lank and teammates Jesa Legacie (Devils Lake, N.D.), Rachel Tharalson (Hoople, N.D.) and Anna Hopkins (Bismarck, N.D.) stole singles in the fourth and fifth ends to build a 5-1 lead at the halfway point. But, Persinger’s rink scored three in the sixth end and followed up by stealing a single to narrow the gap to a one-point advantage to Lank. The North Dakota team scored a deuce in the eighth and limited Alaska to just a single in the ninth to earn the win and stay alive in the playoff hunt.

Minnesota II’s Cory Christensen put the brakes on a two-game losing skid with an 11-3 defeat of Washington’s rookie team led by Shelby Sweet (Everett, Wash.). Hannah Ely’s New York rink kept pace with the top teams by improving to 3-2 as well with a 7-4 win over North Dakota I’s Abigayle Lindgren. Ely (Penfield, N.Y.) and teammates Rebecca Andrew (Towson, Md.), Danica Dombroski (Remsen, N.Y.) and Rebecca Vanarsdall (Silver Spring, Md.) fell behind 4-2 after five ends but kept North Dakota off the scoreboard the remainder of the match as they scored a single in the sixth and stole the next three ends to notch the win.

Four more draws are on tap Wednesday at 8 a.m., noon, 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. To follow along, live end‐by‐end scoring and webstreaming links are posted at www.usacurl.org/curlingrocks. The top four teams in each division advance to Friday’s Page playoffs. The gold-medal matches will be played at noon Saturday.

Game scores, 2 p.m., Women: Minnesota II 11, Washington 3; Wisconsin I 12, New York I 1; New York II 7, North Dakota I 4; Minnesota I 9, Wisconsin II 2; North Dakota II 7, Alaska 6

Game scores, 9 a.m., Men: Massachusetts I 10, Washington 3; Minnesota I 8, Minnesota II 4; Alaska 8, North Dakota II 7; Massachusetts II 7, Wisconsin I 6; Wisconsin II 7, North Dakota I 4

Standings, Women:

Minnesota I (Solem) 5‐0

Wisconsin I (Hamilton) 4‐1

Alaska (Persinger) 3‐2

Minnesota II (Christensen) 3‐2

New York II (Ely) 3‐2

North Dakota II (Lank) 3‐2

Wisconsin II (Elko) 2‐3

New York I (Beebe) 1‐4

North Dakota I (Lindgren) 1‐4

Washington (Sweet) 0‐5

Standings, Men:

Massachusetts I (Leichter) 4‐1

Massachusetts II (Dropkin) 4‐1

Wisconsin I (Landsteiner) 4‐1

Wisconsin II (Gabower) 4‐1

Minnesota I (Wald) 3‐2

Alaska (Birklid) 2‐3

North Dakota I (Workin) 2‐3

North Dakota II (Kitchens) 2‐3

Minnesota II (Runing) 0‐5

Washington (Vukich) 0‐5

USA Curling is sponsored by AtomAmpd, Nike, Brooms Up Curling Supplies, The RAM Restaurant & Brewery, and is partnered with CurlingZone.com.

Follow us on Facebook (search for USA Curling) and Twitter (@terry_usacurl).

SALTWATER ANGLERS REMINDED TO PURCHASE FISHING PERMITS

The Division of Marine Fisheries (DMF) would like to remind saltwater anglers that as of January 1, 2011, recreational saltwater anglers are now required to obtain a Massachusetts saltwater fishing permit. The permit, which costs $10 for both residents and non-residents, was established in response to a federal mandate and is valid for the calendar year. Saltwater fishing permits may be purchased using a credit card online through the Department of Fish and Game’s new electronic licensing system, MassFishHunt. More details and an FAQ page on the permit and permit purchase are found at www.mass.gov/dfwele/dmf/recreationalfishing/rec_permits.htm.  Anglers who are under 16 years old, who are disabled, or who are fishing on permitted for-hire (charter or headboats) are not required to purchase a permit. Anglers age 60 and over are required to obtain a permit, but are exempt from the fee.  A small fee will be charged by the vendor to process the permit through MassFishHunt. Permits are also available at DMF offices located in Boston, Gloucester, and New Bedford . Cash, checks, and money orders are accepted in the Boston office, but only checks and money orders are accepted at the Gloucester and New Bedford offices.

“We are pleased to have the 2011 recreational saltwater fishing permit available to anglers via the MassFishHunt system,” said Division of Marine Fisheries Director Paul Diodati. “This new program will ensure improved recreational fishing programs and new fishing access opportunities for anglers all along the Massachusetts coastline.”

Diodati noted that saltwater fishing permit fees will be deposited in a dedicated account managed by DMF. The fund can be used only to administer the permit program, improve the management of Massachusetts’ marine recreational fisheries and enhance recreational fishing access opportunities in the state. An advisory panel will assist DMF in developing programs for the expenditure of all collected funds.

The new permit system will also allow federal and state marine fisheries biologists to collect better data on saltwater recreational fishing. Managers need quality data to make the best decisions possible on bag limits, seasons, and sizes. Governor Patrick signed the state's Permit Act into law on November 23, 2009, after it was passed unanimously by the Legislature. Support for the Act was driven by a large group of recreational saltwater stakeholders seeking a state permitting program that would exempt anglers from a higher cost federal permit in 2011 and ensure that permit revenues went to local user benefits.

RECORD BREAKING MIDWINTER EAGLE COUNT

On Friday, January 7, 2011, sightings of at least 107 individual bald eagles were reported from Pittsfield to Plymouth as part of a concentrated 1-day effort by state wildlife biologists, volunteers and other eagle enthusiasts, breaking the record count of 81 birds seen in 2009.  This event is part of an annual national bald eagle survey conducted over a 2-week period from late December into early January.

A crew of biologists in a helicopter supplied by National Grid spotted 33 birds and a new eagle nest at Quabbin Reservoir. The same team also observed 18 eagles perched or flying along the Massachusetts stretch of the Connecticut River. Elsewhere across the state, 11 eagles were spotted on the Merrimack River and 5 eagles at Wachusett Reservoir. In the Lakeville/Middleborough area 5 eagles were reported and 2 eagles were seen at the Wattupa Ponds in Westport. There were 2 eagles spotted on the Mystic Lakes in Arlington, 2 on the Housatonic River in Sheffield, and 1 in Orange. On the Chicopee River, 3 eagles were reported, 2 eagles on the Deerfield River, and 1 eagle reported on the Westfield River.

“We thank National Grid, our long time partner in the eagle restoration program, which flew agency biologists by helicopter to survey the Quabbin and Connecticut River,” said Dr. Tom French, Assistant Director of Natural Heritage and Endangered Species. French also noted that citizen interest in the eagle survey has been very useful. “With higher numbers of eagles dispersing throughout their range, we can’t possibly cover the entire state. Citizen spotters play an increasingly important role in our survey efforts.  This year, we received 61 emailed reports from people who saw eagles during the 2-week survey period.”

Listed as endangered in Massachusetts since the 1980s, bald eagles remain on the state list, but are gaining ground in the Bay State – thanks in large part to the restoration project begun in 1982. MassWildlife and its partners brought young eagles from Canada and Michigan and raised them in cages overlooking the Quabbin Reservoir. Some of the eaglets remained and began to nest in the Quabbin, later spreading to the Connecticut River and eventually across the state.

The annual Midwinter Bald Eagle Survey is a nationwide event coordinated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The nationwide total of bald eagles counted during this annual event ranges from 13,000 to 16,000 birds. A fact sheet about bald eagles is found on MassWildlife’s website at www.mass.gov/dfwele/dfw/nhesp/species_info/nhfacts/haliaeetus_leucocephalus.pdf.  A blog about the helicopter crew’s eagle counting experience is posted on the Great Outdoors Blog at: http://environment.blog.state.ma.us/blog/wildlife/.

Not Going Away

January 31, 2011 - In fact it will increase with a double whammy storm that could bring up to almost two feet of snow in two days.

Headed for Warmer Weather

January 31, 2011 - Amtrak heads west through Southborough.

May not be seen by end of week

January 31, 2010 - The gravestones at the Southborough Rural Cemetery are already almost covered by snow.

Winter storm warning in effect from 6 am Tuesday to 1 am est thursday,
The NWS in taunton has issued a winter storm warning for heavy snow, which is in effect from 6 am Tuesday to 1 am est Thursday. The winter storm watch is no longer in effect.
Locations, western and central Massachusetts, as well as interior essex county in Massachusetts.
Hazard types, heavy snow.
Accumulations, 18 to 24 inches of snow.
Timing, snow will overspread this region late tonight, likely affecting the Tuesday morning commute. Snow continues through the day, followed by a brief break Tuesday evening. More snow then should arrive late Tuesday night into Wednesday. It is possible for some sleet to mix with the snow south of route 2 in Massachusetts Wednesday afternoon.
Impacts, significant snow and sleet accumulations will make travel on untreated surfaces treacherous. The additional snow, or even worse heavier sleet, could further strain weaker structures and tree limbs. Power lines may also be downed, resulting in isolated power outages.
Winds, north 5 to 15 mph with gusts up to 25 mph.
Temperatures, around 20 for high temperatures Tuesday and Wednesday. Zero to 10 above for lows Tuesday night.
Visibilities, one half mile at times.
Precautionary/preparedness actions,
A winter storm warning is issued when an average of 6 or more inches of snow is expected in a 12 hour period, or for 8 or more inches in a 24 hour period. Travel will be slow at best on well treated surfaces, and quite difficult on any unplowed or untreated surfaces.
 

Representative Dykema Named to Four Committees

Representative Carolyn Dykema (D-Holliston) is proud to announce that she will serve on four legislative committees for the upcoming two-year session. Rep. Dykema will join, for the first time, the Joint Committee on Health Care Financing and the Joint Committee on Public Health.  She will also continue serving on the Joint Committee on the Environment, Natural Resources & Agriculture and the Joint Committee on Veterans & Federal Affairs.

“I am honored to be chosen for these four important committees where I’ll be able to weigh in on a broad range of issues that my constituents care deeply about,” Dykema said. “I’m particularly eager to begin working with my colleagues to tackle cost containment in the healthcare industry. Today’s high cost of health care and health insurance is hampering our economic recovery and crippling our small businesses. It’s also a huge financial burden on our families and seniors, and I’m eager to play a role in finding needed solutions.”

Rep. Dykema will also continue her work on the Joint Committee on the Environment, Natural Resources, & Agriculture and the Joint Committee on Veterans & Federal Affairs, both of which she has served on for the past two years.

“Supporting returning veterans and advocating for environmental protection are issues I’m passionate about,” said Dykema. “As a returning committee member, I will continue to focus on improving policy around these issues which are so important to the Commonwealth and the people I represent.”

The Southborough News reported the award of this grant late last week, here is some more information on what the Southborough Fire Department will be doing with the grant monies.

The Town of Southborough is the recipient of a Federal Assistance to Firefighters Grant. More information can be obtained here: http://www.firegrantsupport.com/content/html/afg/default.aspx

The grant is a competitive grant and only a small percentage of departments across the country are recipients.  Here is the program guidance for the 2010 program form which this grant was funded: http://www.firegrantsupport.com/docs/2010_AFGguidance.pdf

Southborough as been awarded $85,500 from the federal program, with a required matching amount of $4,500.  Thanks to the Annual Harvard University payment in lieu of taxes (PILOT) contribution, the cost of the equipment to the taxpayers is $0.00

The grant will fund the replacement of most of the Self-Contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) units worn by firefighters in smoke, fire, hazardous materials incidents, and carbon monoxide calls. Many of the units being replaced are near the end of their lifecycle, and all do not meet current safety standards. The SCBA were scheduled for replacement in the FY13 budget cycle.

Sports and Recreation
Support your ARHS Gymnastics Team

A little bit of information from the team.  gymnastics league meet is this coming Saturday at ARHS at 11.  Also, Algonquin is the host site for State Individual Gymnastic Competition on February 13th.  This promises to be an exciting day with the top high school gymnasts in the state competing.  They are also hosting a gymnastics camp during February School Vacation week.
 

WHAT:    Gymnastics camp

              run by the Algonquin gymnastics team and coaches

WHO:      boys and girls grades K thru 5

WHERE:  ARHS Gymnastics Gym

WHEN:    February vacation – Tuesday thru Friday,

                     February 22nd- 25th 9am-11am

                  Gym Show Finale Friday at 10am

The Faces of Hockey

January 30, 2011 - Enjoying an early Sunday morning game of hockey at the ice rink at Woodward School today.

Winding up for a one two punch

January 30, 2011 - The ground hog will be hiding Wednesday because according to weather forecasters, light fluffy 6" snowfall is coming Tuesday with a prediction of ice, sleet and snow maybe rounding out to 15" on Wednesday.

Start out early and learn to speak French.  Enrich your education whether for travel or work.  Involve the kids too.

Click the ad above to learn more about Bonjour ABC

Day

 

  Time

 

 Tuition

 

 Food/Beverages

 

  February camp (5-10yrs) 

  Feb 22,23,24

   9:30 - 12:00      $90  

 Snack provided &

 Bring a lunch

Sunday  23

Monday  24

Tuesday 25

Wednesday 26

Thursday 27

Friday 28

Saturday 29

  Preschool Story Time
Jan 31 10:30 AM  
 

 

 

 

 

 

Southborough Library  website:  Click here

Senior Center Activities

17 Monday 18 Tuesday 19 Wednesday 20 Thursday 21 Friday 22 Saturday
8:30 am Health clinic 7:45 am Walking Group 8:30 am Health clinic 9:30 Mah Jongg
10:00 AM Canasta
open 9:00 AM
9:30 Tai Chi
8:30 am Foxwoods bus trip
  11:00 Senior Singers 10 AM Creative Writers 12:00 Pitch 10:30 am Woodward Care assembly
9:30 am Cribbage 12:00 PM Bridge
 
 
 
5:00 Business Advisory Council
2:00 Fitness   2 pm fitness  

-- SPECIAL NOTICE --

Senior Center "Main Room" is CLOSED
for Construction during the months of
Jan. & Feb. 20011

There will be NO Blues Plate Specials

Following is a list of Temporary Locations:

 

 

Fitness:

Pilgrim Church

Tai Chi:

Pilgrim Church

Senior Singers:

Pilgrim Church

Painting Workshops:

Colonial Gardens

Bridge:

Colonial Gardens (12-3)

Mah Jongg:

Board of Health

Saturday Mornings:

Country Kitchen at Senior Center

 

 

Inclement Weather Closing Policy

If Southboro Schools are delayed or closed due to inclement weather, then the Senior Center will be closed that day and all programs are cancelled, including Meals-on-Wheels

Click here for the Senior Center Website

Support Our Senior Centers:

Stop on in and get your "Senior Centers Bumper Sticker"

Southborough meetings

January 31 to February 4, 2010

Meeting

Date

Time

Where

Advisory Board - Agenda Jan 31 7:30 PM Trottier Middle School Library, 49 Parkerville Road
Board of Selectmen - Agenda Jan 31 7:30 PM Trottier Middle School Library, 49 Parkerville Road
Southborough School Committee - Agenda Jan 31 7:30 PM Trottier Middle School Library, 49 Parkerville Road
Metrowest Regional Transit Authority - Executive Session Jan 31 4:30  PM 37 Waverly Street, Framingham
Assabet Valley Regional School Committee - Agenda Feb 1 7:00 PM School Committee Conference Room, Assabet Valley Regional High School, 215 Fitchburg Street, Marlborough
Board of Selectmen - Agenda
Executive Session at 6:00; Open Meeting at 7:00 pm.

 
Feb 1 6:00 PM executive

7:00 PM Open

McAuliffe Hearing Room, Town House
Library Board of Trustees - Agenda Feb 1 5:30 PM Southborough Library
Site Plan Review Committee - Agenda Feb 1 11:00 AM McAuliffe Hearing Room, Town House
Youth Commission - Agenda Feb 1 7:15 PM Conference Room, Fayville Hall, 42 Central Street
Zoning Advisory Committee - Agenda Feb 2 7:00 PM McAuliffe Hearing Room, Town House
Council on Aging - Agenda Feb 2 7:00 PM Country Kitchen, Cordaville Hall, 9 Cordaville Road
Capital Budget Planning Committee - Agenda Feb 2 6:30 PM Small conference room, Town House
Board of Assessors - Agenda Feb 2 8:30 AM McAuliffe Hearing Room, Town House
Green Technology and Recycling Committee - Agenda Feb 3 7:30 PM Conference Room, DPW Building, 149 Cordaville Road

Notes from St. Matthew’s Church

Highland Street, Southborough

SOUPER BOWL SUNDAY FOOD COLLECTION ON FEBRUARY 5TH AND 6TH

The Youth of the parish will be collecting cans of soup and/or monetary donations to benefit the Southborough Food Pantry this weekend. Contact: Jimmy & Jane Knowles knowles39@verizon.net if you have any questions.

WINTER STORM NOTICEs

Please note that if the public schools of Southborough cancel or delay opening due to inclement weather conditions, our 8:00am Daily Masses will be canceled. For storms that occur on weekends or during school vacations, please call the Parish Office at 508-485-2285    to hear notices of possible Mass cancellations.

PLANNING COMMITTEE MEETING

2nd Annual Wine Tasting Event

To Benefit the St. Matthew Scholarship Fund

Sunday, January 30 at 4:00pm in the Parish Center

We are looking for volunteers to help with this event that will

be offering food, raffle or silent auction and of course wine!

Parents of high school students who might benefit from our

scholarship are encouraged to help out or participate. If you

are available and would like to volunteer, please email or call

Barbara Murphy at bmurphy@stmatthewsb.org

 or 508-481-7292.

ST.  MATTHEW/ST.  ANNE  BASKETBALL  TEAMS

Last weekend, the St. Matthew’s basketball team had a very

convincing victory over Our Lady of the Rosary with a score of

62-50. Their record is now 3-3. On Sunday, the St. Anne’s

basketball team jumped to a 15-2 lead and then cruised to a 55-

46 victory over St. George’s. This brings their record to a 4-4

with 2 regular season games left to go. Please visit the Office

for Youth Ministry website at www.ymworcester.org for game

schedule and directions and come cheer the teams on.

The Merrimack River Eagle Festival - February 12, 2011

Download Eagle Festival Map (PDF 568K)

Newburyport, Massachusetts

Saturday, February 12, 2011

ALL FREE

 Presented by Mass Audubon’s Joppa Flats Education Center

and the Parker River National Wildlife Refuge

 Come to Newburyport on February 12th for a full day of activities celebrating the return of our Bald Eagles!

 VISIT EAGLE HOT SPOTS  9:00 – 4:00

Naturalists will show you Bald Eagles along the Merrimack River. See Map for locations. All ages welcome.

GO ON AN EAGLE TOUR  9:00 – 2:00

Tours start every half hour and take 1.5 hours to complete. Departure point: The Newburyport Chamber of Commerce. Advance registration required (978-462-9998). Recommended for adults and children age 6 and over.

SEE AN EAGLE DEMONSTRATION  10:00 – 11:00 or 1:30 – 2:30

Tom Ricardi of the Massachusetts Bird of Prey Rehabilitation Facility presents two educational programs for all ages at Newburyport’s City Hall featuring raptors great and small. First come, first served.

POSE FOR A PHOTO WITH A RAPTOR – 11:15-11:45 or 12:30-1:00

Hunt’s Photo & Video will take your photo with a raptor for a $10 donation to the Eagle Festival. Newburyport City Hall. Limited availability. Advance registration recommended (978-462-9998). Otherwise, first come, first served.

HAVE FUN WITH YOUR FAMILY  9:00 – 4:00

At the Parker River National Wildlife Refuge Headquarters: Make an eagle button or dissect an owl pellet! Special features: owls from Mass Audubon’s Drumlin Farm, from 11:00 to 3:00; also, Henry Lappen uses masks, comedy, and audience participation to present “A Passion for Birds,” 12:00 to 1:00. First come, first served.

At Mass Audubon’s Joppa Flats Education Center: Make an eagle nest and play nature games! Special feature: hawks from Mass Audubon’s Drumlin Farm, from 11:00 to 3:00. 

FIND EAGLE FESTIVAL INFORMATION 8:30 - 4:00

Eagle Festival information will be available at all festival headquarter sites:

 Mass Audubon’s Joppa Flats Education Center, 1 Plum Island Turnpike, Newburyport, 978-462-9998

Parker River National Wildlife Refuge Headquarters, 6 Plum Island Turnpike, Newburyport, 978-465-5753

The Newburyport Chamber of Commerce, 38R Merrimac Street, Newburyport, 978-462-6680

Newburyport City Hall, 60 Pleasant Street, Newburyport

Sports and Recreation

SOUTHBOROUGH  RECREATION  DEPARTMENT

LOOKING  FOR  IDEAS  – The Recreation Department is

forming a group to brainstorm ideas for fun activities for

Southborough Teens. If you are a concerned parent looking for

appropriate activities for your teen or have a great idea you want to

share, please join us. Contact Doreen Ferguson at

dferguson@southboroughma.com or Karen White at

lostglasses2@aol.com.

ARHS loses to Hudson

January 30, 2011 - The team lost 3 -0.