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Archived Page 163

July 4, 2010 - July 10, 2010

It's Out Again and Dangerous to our Trees

July 10, 2010 -  The Asian Long Horned Beetle (ALB) has been the nemesis of Worcester since August of 2008 - although that is the year it was officially identified but it is believed to have been in Worcester for over a decade.  With this summer's warm temperatures there has been an earlier emergence of the adult beetle within the Worcester quarantine.  The biggest news is that it was discovered in six trees at the Faulkner Hospital in Jamaica Plain earlier this week.  Those trees have since been removed and crews are searching property by property all host trees within the new Boston quarantine area which is a mile and half in an area around the infested trees.

The Beetle
Seeing spots? You may have ALB. While the ALB may appear threatening, it is harmless to humans and pets. The adult ALB is a distinctive-looking insect with the following unique characteristics:

  • 1 to 1 ½ inches in length

  • Long antennae banded with black and white (longer than the insect’s body)

  • Shiny, jet black body with distinctive white spots

  • Six legs

  • May have blue feet

Adult beetles are most active during the summer and early fall. Throughout the summer, they can be seen on tree branches, walls, outdoor furniture, cars and sidewalks. If you see the beetle or any signs of infestation, you need to report it immediately.

You won’t see the beetle after the first frost until it emerges again in the summer. During the winter months, the beetle’s larvae tunnel deep into the trees they infest. Although you can’t spot it, you can still be a beetle buster by not moving firewood. Moving firewood can spread the beetle, its larvae and its eggs to healthy trees. So buy it locally and burn it locally, and don’t move firewood off of your property.

The Asian Long Horned Beetle has been found in Chicago, New York, New Jersey, Toronto - Canada and Worcester.  In Worcester over 25,000 host trees have been cut and over 60,000 trees were injected this year.  Crews are still surveying and regulating within the quarantine area.   This beetle is wanted.  A dozen trees are on the host target list that the beetle enjoys eating.  They include in no special order Maple, Birch, Willow, Horse Chestnut, Mimosa, Hackberry, Ash, Elm, Katsura, Sycamore and Poplar.  They do not appear to bother Oak, Hickory, pines and spruces or fruit trees. It is a dangerous forest and shade tree pest that needs to be stopped ASAP. It is better to lose one tree than a dozen or worse yet thousands.  There are several look a like bugs out there such as the white spotted pine sawyer. 

One of the fastest ways the ALB can move through the forest and city trees is by the transportation of firewood.  Please do not move firewood to second homes or campgrounds.  http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/

Because the adults have been emerging and the new discovery of the ALB in Boston, I will share several links with the Southborough News readers on how to spot an Asian Long Horned Beetle and if you should find one where to call or report the find.  If you have found one, it is best to capture it, put it in a container and then the freezer before calling.

beetlebusters.info    http://www.mass.gov/agr/alb.htm    USDA ALB

Don't move firewood video   Fun video on description of ALB

Smithsonian Magazine article   Lurking in the Trees 

New documentary video "Bugged" trailer

Vermont News media video part 1   Vermont News Media video part 2

Printable Pest Alert for ALB

particular feed pattern eating along the veins

A captured, killed and frozen beetle awaits pinning

beetle and beetle damage

egg sites on tree trunk

ALB crawling up tree

egg sites, frass, exit holes, signs of the ALB

larvae and tunnels in split wood after tree removal

more larvae and tunnels

All photos above were taken in Worcester, MA

Space Weather News for July 10, 2010
http://spaceweather.com

A LIVELY SOLAR ECLIPSE:  Fast-growing sunspot 1087 is crackling with C-class solar flares.  A spectacular eruption recorded by the Solar Dynamics Observatory is featured on today's edition of Spaceweather.com.  This surge in activity comes on the eve of a total eclipse of the sun over the South Pacific.  Will eclipse chasers see material blasting away from the sun when the Moon hides the blinding stellar surface?  It's a possibility. Stay tuned to http://spaceweather.com for updates and pictures from the path of totality.

SUNSET CONJUNCTION:  Look west at sunset.  Venus is passing by 1st magnitude star Regulus. They're only a little more than a degree apart.  Bright Venus catches the eye first. As the glow of sunset fades, Regulus pops out of the twilight a little below Venus. The view through binoculars is superb.

SPACE WEATHER ALERTS:  Did you miss the last big solar flare or geomagnetic storm? Don't let that happen again. Turn your cell phone into a full-featured space weather alert system: http://spaceweatherphone.com
 

Clean the car - Go to Choice Car Wash 155 Boston Road/Rte 30 Southborough, don't forget to fill up at Southborough Auto Tech right next door.

 

Wet Crossing

July 10, 2010 - After several days of extreme heat with water restrictions, brown lawns, thirsty gardens and families headed to the beach, we got a little rain this afternoon.  Some areas saw two or more inches of rain in a short time.

EVACUATION STEPS FOR A HURRICANE

MEMA Offers Tips To Help Prepare You and Your Family

View Details

FRAMINGHAM, MA - “If evacuation is necessary for an approaching hurricane, or any type of natural or man-made emergency, the key is that you and your family respond quickly and responsibly,” states Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency Acting Director Kurt Schwartz. “Unlike many types of storms, hurricanes are closely tracked and can be followed closely by the Media, for as long as a week before reaching New England, therefore everyone is usually afforded enough warning and should not be taken off guard if you are directed to take precautionary steps, including an evacuation.” 

Being Alerted

State or local Public Safety officials may alert you by one or several methods.  Learn what methods are utilized in your community from your community’s Emergency Management Director. The various methods could include:

·         Outdoor sirens or horns.

·         The Emergency Alert System (EAS) - information provided on the radio and television.

·          National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Alert Radio.

·         ‘All Call’, ‘Reverse 911’, ‘Code Red’, etc. – one of a number of automated telephoning systems for sending recorded messages to which your community may subscribe.

·         News Media.

·         Residential Route Alerting, which dispatches Public Safety vehicles traveling through neighborhoods announcing messages with Public Address systems or literally ‘knocking on doors’.

·         U.S. Coast Guard Marine Broadcast.

·         A message on Teletypewriters (TTY) for the deaf and hard of hearing.

Planning for Evacuation

·         Ask your local Emergency Management Office about your community’s evacuation plans.

·         Learn proposed evacuation routes and locations of potential public shelters.

·         If you do not have personal transportation, make plans with friends or your local government.

·         Develop a Family Communications Plan.

·         Make a plan with family members for a destination if you have to leave your community.  (In your planning, consider different scales of evacuation, i.e.: neighborhood, community, county, etc.)

·         Assemble a Disaster Supply Kit.

·         Keep your car fueled if evacuation seems likely.  Gas stations may be closed during an emergency, run out of fuel, or be unable to pump gas during power outages.

·         Pre-drill plywood to be able to quickly board up windows.

·         Know how to safely shut off your home’s electricity, gas and water supplies at main switches and valves.

What to do if asked/told to evacuate

·         Gather all persons in the house together.

·         Elevate valuable items to higher points within your home.

·         Move all loose outdoor items, which could become missiles, indoors. (lawn furniture, hanging plants, trashcans, awnings, toys, etc).

·         Household members outside the area may be advised not to return during an evacuation.  They may be directed to a reception center or mass care shelter where you can join them.

·         Do not call your local fire or police departments (9-1-1) for information.  Emergency workers will need their lines open for emergency use.  If you need special help, call your local Emergency Management Office or Mass2-1-1, which is available 24/7 to respond to your questions.

·         Monitor the Media. Stay tuned to your Emergency Alert System (EAS) radio station.

·         Turn off lights and unnecessary appliances.

·         Close and lock windows and doors.

·         Check with neighbors to see if they need assistance.  Offer to share transportation.

·         Let others know where you are going.

·         If you need a ride, try to get one with neighbors or contact your local Emergency Management Office.

How to travel

·         Keep the car radio tuned to an Emergency Alert System (EAS) station.

·         Be aware of and follow designated evacuation routes.

What to take with you

Think of essential items.  You may be away from home for a few hours to a few days.

·         Clothing for several days.

·         Toilet articles (Soap, toothbrush, toothpaste, shampoo, etc.)

·         Prescription medicines, medical equipment and important medical records.

·         Special dietary foods.

·         Baby supplies.

·         Blankets, pillows, and towels (particularly if you plan on staying at a public mass care shelter).

·         Identification and important papers.

·         Checkbook, credit card and cash.

About your pets

·         Only seeing-eye dogs and other service animals will be allowed inside most reception centers and mass care shelters, although in many communities, SMART (The State of Massachusetts Animal Response Team) may be able to assist at these facilities with animal sheltering accommodations.

·         Make plans ahead of time to take your pet to stay at relatives, friends or a kennel outside the affected area.

·         Learn of pet-friendly hotels and motels in the area.

·         Prepare an emergency kit for your pets; include collars & leashes, a 3-5 day supply of food and water, a manual can opener, bowls, litter boxes, photographs of you with your pet, and a week’s supply of medications that your pet may be taking, including instructions (in case you and your pet are separated).

·         Make sure your pets wear collars with current license and rabies tags, and identification tags that include information on where you will be staying during the emergency.

·         Use a pet carrier for each of your pets to make transportation easier.

·         Remember: “If you go, they go!”

The Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) is the state agency responsible for coordinating federal, state, local, voluntary and private resources during emergencies and disasters in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.  MEMA provides leadership to: develop plans for effective response to all hazards, disasters or threats; train emergency personnel to protect the public; provide information to the citizenry; and assist individuals, families, businesses and communities to mitigate against, prepare for, and respond to and recover from emergencies, both natural and man made. For additional information about MEMA and Hurricane Preparedness, go to www.mass.gov/mema. Follow MEMA updates on Facebook and Twitter.

Sports and Recreation
Getting Fit in Southborough

apparel,backpacking,boots,hikers,hiking,hiking boots,men,nature,persons,rivers,sportsWalking Trails

Running Routes

“THE SOUND OF MUSIC” PERFORMANCES JULY 8-11

Metrowest Family Theater of Sudbury proudly presents “The Sound of Music” on July 8, 9, and 10 at 7:00pm and July 11 at 2:00pm at the Trottier Middle School, 49 Parkerville Road in Southborough.

 

Our cast features over 50 men, women, teens, and children from Sudbury, Wayland, Weston, Framingham, Stow, Brookline, and beyond!

 

The final collaboration between Rodgers & Hammerstein was destined to become the world's most beloved musical. When a postulant proves too high-spirited for the religious life, she is dispatched to serve as governess for the seven children of a widowed naval Captain. Her growing rapport with the youngsters, coupled with her generosity of spirit, gradually captures the heart of the stern Captain, and they marry. The family's narrow escape over the mountains to Switzerland on the eve of World War II provides one of the most thrilling and inspirational finales ever presented in the theatre.

 

Tickets are $16 for general admission and $20 for advanced premium seating which includes the first five rows center guaranteed.  Group rates are available.  You may order online by visiting www.mftsudbury.org or by calling 508-450-7847.

CAST MEMBERS BY TOWN:

Acton: Carly Chinitz, Lisa Lapinski, Alison Takacs, Grace Takacs, Rosemary Takacs

Ashland: Emily Schultz, Gail Schultz, Mara Wilson                                       Boylston: Alexis Weiss

Brookline: Ryan Cook      

Framingham: Ava Caiola, Deborah DuBourdieu, Jason Hammel, Vicki Hammel, Kristin Hatfield, Madison Kornbliet, David Ortmeyer

Hudson: Chris Jordan                          Leicester: Susan Stockwell                                               Littleton: Linnea Ross

Marlboro: Samantha Keville                              Natick: Lorraine Magee                     Revere: Lauren Drapek

Southborough: Amanda Christy, Megan Christy, Karleigh Kebartas, Lexi Ryan                     Stow: Meili Stanten

Sudbury: Emily Bogdan, Jesse Bogdan, Caitlin Carter, Jane Cunningham, Kayleigh Cyr, Lita Erman, Ed Fell, Janet Fell, Hailey Gangitano, Ella Houlihan, Sara Kimble, Haley Lanzoni, Alexis Miller, Christina Miller, Allison Pellegrino, Jill Pellegrino, Julia Pilavin, Stephanie Pilavin, Avery Serven, Slater Smith, Jr., Chloe Thomas, Sara Zieff

Upton: Jackie Theoharis                      Waltham: Deirdre McCourt               Watertown: Virginia Jay, Caroline Kurman

 
The Performing Arts Connection
Where everyone gets to be in the limelight!
31 Union Avenue, Sudbury, MA 01776
(978) 443-2400
www.performingartsconnection.com
 

Framingham REI — Framingham Summer Concert Series

  • Time: 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. (EDT)

  • Leader: Town of Framingham

 

Description: Framingham Summer Concert Series Famingham Village Green 6:30 - 8:30 PM Fridays in July Join REI and the Town of Framingham on Friday nights in July for this FREE concert series at Framingham Village Green at Edgell Road and Vernon Street. For info see http://www.framinghamma.gov/CurrentEvents.aspx?EID=34938

More Partner Information:

Selectmen and School committee meetings are now telecast on cable, click here for more information on what is available at what times on Southborough cable.

Tatnuck Bookseller Newsletter, click here to go to www.tatnuck.com


 
 

Visit www.tatnuck.com

Welcome | Buy A Book | Gift Gallery | Events | Cafe | Kids Corner

 
Sports and Recreation

Brookline Bird Club

Sunday, July 11

Quabbin Reservoir, Gate 10. Morning.

Join Glenn on a 4-to-5-mile walk through a very birdy area with species ranging from Broad-winged Hawk to Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Blue-headed Vireo, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Scarlet Tanager, Baltimore Oriole, and lots of stuff in between. (Maybe a moose or a bobcat!) Contact leader for date and meeting place.

Glenn d'Entremont, Stoughton               (781)344-5857         (781)344-5857

A Birding 101 Trip

A Limited Mobility Trip

Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Concord. Morning.

Beginners and those with limited mobility welcome. Meeting Place: Refuge parking lot off Monsen Road, Concord. 7:00 AM

Ida Giriunas, Reading               (781)929-8772         (781)929-8772

Monday, July 12

Plum Island. Evening.

We will be looking for early-migrating shorebirds, Saltmarsh and Seaside Sparrows, and the flocks of herons flying in to roost. Meeting Place: Parking lot #1 on Parker River National Wildlife Refuge. 5:30 PM

Tom Young, Merrimack               (603)424-4512         (603)424-4512

 

Reminder -Registration for Triboro Youth Hockey for 2010/11 is open.

 goal tenders,goalies,hockey players,leisure,people,persons,sports

Registration for the 2010 season requires a $200 non-refundable deposit.

Final fees for the 2010 season have not yet been determined as we are waiting for the league fees to be set by the Northstar and New England Sports Center rinks. However, we expect the Triboro 2010 Mite through Bantam fee to be slightly higher than the 2009 fee of $1,200.

We expect the 2010 Midget fee to be slightly higher than the 2009 fee of $425.


 

Register your child for the 2010 program by going to
http://leagueathletics.com/Registration/Default.asp?snid=461253143&org=TRIBORO.ORG
The Black Box

July 8, 2010 - Residents have been noticing these new black boxes up around a few streets in town.  They are part of upgrading the water system to help the town manage its water more efficiently.  The SCADA or Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition will give real time data to the water department making them aware of any changes in the water distribution system.

VOLUNTARY ODD/EVEN OUTSIDE WATER USE RESTRICTION IN EFFECT SUMMER 2010 6/30/10-9/22/10

RACE OF THE CENTURY
Collings Foundation, Stow MA
August 21st and 22nd
The most FANTASTIC, STUPENDOUS, INCREDIBLE series of races.....
in the world!

During the early 1900’s the first auto carriages were invented. The thought of a “horseless carriage” rumbling down the path - or better yet - a “flying machine” moving through the air seemed amazing. The traditional horse and buggy quickly became history with the emergence of auto carriages like the 1905 Franklin and aircraft such as the 1909 Bleriot Type XI.
Which technologies will win? There is only one way to find out:
Horse/1867 Stage Coach Vs. 1904 Franklin Type A Roadster: No competition here… silly motorized carriage. We all know where the real “horse power” lies.

Horse/Buggy Vs. 1908 Steamer: This will be a close race. An automobile that runs on water? Incredible! Can it be the horse and buggy has met its match?


Pony Express Vs. 1909 Bleriot Type XI Flying Machine: The most incredible race ever! - One of the fastest horses this side of the Mississippi against this amazing flying machine.

1937 Offy Sprint Car Vs. 1942 Stearman: Fresh from the 1937 New England race circuit - our driver “Blazing Bruce” will go all out to prove a true race machine is faster than any aircraft in a 1/8 mile “nose to prop” race.

See an amazing exhibition and display of carriages, carts and horses from the Massachusetts Carriage and Driving Society, antique bicycles, silent movie performances and more! The Collings Foundation’s amazing collection of over 90 automobiles, racecars and aircraft will be open for viewing. The Race of the Century takes place over the weekend of August 21st and 22nd, 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM. PT-17 Stearman bi-plane and T-6 Texan flights will be available. No reservations needed to attend. Call to reserve flights. More information see our web site.

We will be hosting a pre-event party / Collings Foundation meet and greet on Friday, August 20th, 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM. Appetizers and drinks will be served. A great opportunity to get a personal tour of the facility, ride in a couple machines that will participate in the races and have fun! $50 per person. Call for reservations: 800.568.8924
____________________________________________

$260,000 GRANT TO LIFT LAND PROTECTION EFFORTS IN MASSACHUSETTS

Athol—Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust announced that it has been awarded $260,000 from the AmeriCorps program in support of the Massachusetts Land Initiative for Tomorrow. Mount Grace executive director Leigh Youngblood described the new grant as "An opportunity to engage local communities in land conservation at a time of greater recognition of the importance of local food and healthy forests."

Sudbury Valley Trustees will be the regional coordinator within the watershed area of the Concord, Assabet and Sudbury Rivers for MassLIFT, a collaboration of seven regional conservation groups designed to meet Massachusetts’ needs for land protection, including starting new conservation projects, stewardship of protected lands, outreach to the community, and service learning opportunities to engage young people in conservation. MassLIFT is modeled on a pilot project carried out by Mount Grace in 2008-2010 funded by the Massachusetts Commonwealth Corps program. Early results from that project included the establishment of new community gardens, trail adoptions by community groups, and new programs in schools to certify vernal pools.

Other partners include Franklin Land Trust, Greater Worcester Land Trust, Kestrel Trust, Nashua River Watershed Association, and Wildlands Trust. Each partner will host at least one AmeriCorps member and will provide staff support for the program. The partners will also be raising money to fund the costs of supporting the program.

The $260,000 grant provides stipends for twenty AmeriCorps volunteers who will serve for at least one year as full time Land Stewards, Outreach Coordinators, Regional Conservationists, or Service Learning Coordinators. Each position has different responsibilites and goals: Land Stewards monitor protected land to ensure that conservation agreements are followed; Outreach Coordinators work to involve community groups in conservation and to strengthen ties to the land; Regional Conservationists initiate and implement new conservation projects; and Service Learning Coordinators expand education and volunteer programs to bring young people into greater contact with the outdoors to learn about and assist with conservation, farming, and forestry.

Ron McAdow, Executive Director of Sudbury Valley Trustees, praises "the MassLift program as a boost to land protection and conservation at a time when such efforts are more critical than ever." He describes the AmeriCorps grant as an opportunity for SVT to strengthen land protection outreach and significantly increase its capacity to monitor 80

properties and 50 conservation restrictions. It should help augment our ability to support the local land trusts in our region, and most importantly, it provides a wonderful opportunity to assist a new generation of conservationists."

MassLIFT aims to help AmeriCorps members develop skills necessary to carry out conservation projects in their communities, increase community participation in land protection, and lead to the conservation and stewardship of more Massachusetts land including community gardens, farms, working forests, trails, wetlands, and parks.

"As a volunteer Land Steward with Commonwealth Corps, I’ve put my education to work and gained hands on experience monitoring protected land for local trusts," said current volunteer Alex Krofta, of his time with Mount Grace. "At the same time, I’ve learned new skills and gained an understanding of how conservation works in Massachusetts."

Those interested in volunteering for land conservation with AmeriCorps in Massachusetts can contact Dee Robbins, Program Manager for MassLIFT at robbins@mountgrace.org. Volunteers who want to focus on conservation in the watershed area of the Concord, Assabet and Sudbury Rivers can also visit the SVT website or contact Ron McAdow, SVT Executive Director at rmcadow@svtweb.org. AmeriCorps volunteers typically commit to either one or two years of full time service through the program, which also provides free health insurance and money for college after the volunteer completes the program successfully.

The volunteers will join 57,000 AmeriCorps members nationwide in service to their communities in support of the five national priorities laid out in the Serve America Act: education, healthy futures, clean energy and the environment, veterans, and economic opportunity. By engaging with volunteers around the state, MassLIFT will help the seven partner groups, along with participating town conservation boards and small land trusts, to protect land and water in towns they serve from the Berkshires to the Cape.

Hopkinton Farmers Market at Weston Nurseries

Fridays, 12:00 pm - 6:00 pm, June 11 to October 15, 2010

View DetailsWeston Nurseries Parking lot on Rte. 135

Weston Nurseries 93 East Main Street

Hopkinton, MA 01748

Friday

12:00 PM TO 6:00 PM

6/11/2010 THROUGH 10/15/2010

Click here for more info on MA Farmer's markets

Thomas F. Cox, 56, of Franklin, died on Wednesday, July 7, 2010 peacefully and surrounded by his family. He was the beloved husband of Joan (Taylor) Cox and the son of Florence (Hill) Cox and the late James Bud Cox of Southborough. Tom was a 1972 graduate of Algonquin Regional High School of Northborough; attended Dean College of Franklin and was a graduate of the College of Financial Planning. He had a career in sales before he became Senior Vice President of Winslow, Evans and Crocker, Inc of Boston. Tom enjoyed visits to Cape Cod, his dogs and his home. However, his greatest joy was spending time with his 5 grandchildren. In addition to his wife and mother, he is survived by his daughters, Rachel Trombly and her husband Sean of Milford, NH; Elizabeth Leighton and her husband Stephen of Hopkinton; 3 brothers, James Cox of Chicago; Timothy Cox and his wife Patricia of Thompson, CT; Steven Cox of Southborough; 5 grandchildren, Hannah & Hailey Trombly ; Paige, Cathryn & Stephen Leighton; 2 sister in laws, Cheryl Lindberg and her husband Peter of E. Windsor, CT; Nancy Adams of Franklin; Kim Taylor and his wife Deborah of E. Bridgewater; and many nieces and nephews. There are no calling hours. Mass of Resurrection will be held on Saturday, July 10, at 10:30 AM at St. Matthew Church, Highland St. Southborough. Expressions of sympathy may be sent in his memory to Dana Farber Cancer Institute, neuro oncology dept. 44 Binney St. Boston, MA 02115. Arrangements are under the direction of the Morris Funeral Home 40 Main St. Southborough,http://www.morrisfuneralparlor.com/

Sports and Recreation

Save the Date for a Family Camping Weekend, August 7-8, 2010!

 

campgrounds,camping,campsites,leisure,recreation,sports,tents

If your family (or a family you know) has always wanted to learn how to camp, a fun-filled Becoming an Outdoors Family Camping Weekend is planned for novice campers at Harold Parker State Forest in Andover on August 7-8, 2010.  Mark your calendars now! Organized by the Department of Conservation and Recreation and the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife's Becoming an Outdoorswoman Program, families new to camping will have the option of learning some basic camping skills and as well as other outdoor recreational skills such as archery, fishing, canoeing and hiking.   Registration materials will be posted soon at the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife's Becoming an Outdoorswoman Calendar: http://www.mass.gov/dfwele/dfw/education/bow/bow_calendar.htm.

Discover the wild side of Massachusetts at www.mass.gov/masswildlife!

  

Do you like trucks?

Do you want to climb on them and explore?

Then join us at the

 Southborough Library for

TRUCK DAY

THURSDAY, JULY 8

11:00 – 12:00

All children welcome!

There will also be outdoor activities and ice cream sundaes!

“THE SOUND OF MUSIC” PERFORMANCES JULY 8-11

Metrowest Family Theater of Sudbury proudly presents “The Sound of Music” on July 8, 9, and 10 at 7:00pm and July 11 at 2:00pm at the Trottier Middle School, 49 Parkerville Road in Southborough.

 

Our cast features over 50 men, women, teens, and children from Sudbury, Wayland, Weston, Framingham, Stow, Brookline, and beyond!

 

The final collaboration between Rodgers & Hammerstein was destined to become the world's most beloved musical. When a postulant proves too high-spirited for the religious life, she is dispatched to serve as governess for the seven children of a widowed naval Captain. Her growing rapport with the youngsters, coupled with her generosity of spirit, gradually captures the heart of the stern Captain, and they marry. The family's narrow escape over the mountains to Switzerland on the eve of World War II provides one of the most thrilling and inspirational finales ever presented in the theatre.

 

Tickets are $16 for general admission and $20 for advanced premium seating which includes the first five rows center guaranteed.  Group rates are available.  You may order online by visiting www.mftsudbury.org or by calling 508-450-7847.

CAST MEMBERS BY TOWN:

Acton: Carly Chinitz, Lisa Lapinski, Alison Takacs, Grace Takacs, Rosemary Takacs

Ashland: Emily Schultz, Gail Schultz, Mara Wilson                                       Boylston: Alexis Weiss

Brookline: Ryan Cook      

Framingham: Ava Caiola, Deborah DuBourdieu, Jason Hammel, Vicki Hammel, Kristin Hatfield, Madison Kornbliet, David Ortmeyer

Hudson: Chris Jordan                          Leicester: Susan Stockwell                                               Littleton: Linnea Ross

Marlboro: Samantha Keville                              Natick: Lorraine Magee                     Revere: Lauren Drapek

Southborough: Amanda Christy, Megan Christy, Karleigh Kebartas, Lexi Ryan                     Stow: Meili Stanten

Sudbury: Emily Bogdan, Jesse Bogdan, Caitlin Carter, Jane Cunningham, Kayleigh Cyr, Lita Erman, Ed Fell, Janet Fell, Hailey Gangitano, Ella Houlihan, Sara Kimble, Haley Lanzoni, Alexis Miller, Christina Miller, Allison Pellegrino, Jill Pellegrino, Julia Pilavin, Stephanie Pilavin, Avery Serven, Slater Smith, Jr., Chloe Thomas, Sara Zieff

Upton: Jackie Theoharis                      Waltham: Deirdre McCourt               Watertown: Virginia Jay, Caroline Kurman

 
The Performing Arts Connection
Where everyone gets to be in the limelight!
31 Union Avenue, Sudbury, MA 01776
(978) 443-2400
www.performingartsconnection.com
 

THE THREAT OF WILDFIRES IN THE COMMONWEALTH

 

“The combination of high temperatures and warm breezes, following a very dry period, creates a recipe for the increased risk of brush and forest fires,” says Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency Acting Director Kurt Schwartz.  Wildfires often begin unnoticed, but spread quickly, igniting brush, trees and homes.  There are three different classes of wild fires. A ‘surface fire’ is the most common type, burning along the forest floor, moving slowly and killing or damaging trees.  A ‘ground fire’, usually started by lightning, burns on or below the forest floor. ‘Crown fires’ spread rapidly by the wind, moving quickly by jumping along the treetops. Because 80% of forest fires are started by negligent human behavior, such as smoking in forested areas or improperly extinguishing campfires most are preventable.

 

The Public is urged to obey all burning regulations set in place by Public Safety officials.

 

Tips for Campers

  • Use extreme caution with disposal of smoking materials, cooking coals, and campfires.

  • Maintain at least a 3’ clear area free from leaves, dry grass, pine needles, etc. around grills, fireplaces and tents.

  • Handle flammable liquids with care, storing them only in metal containers, using them only for their intended use.

  • Fill lanterns and stoves a safe distance downwind from sources of heat or open flames.

  • Make sure that barbeque stands/portable stoves are level and sturdy.

  • Keep a water container nearby when coals/campfires are burning.

  • When cooking is over, soak the coals/fires to prevent re-ignition.

  • Pitch your tent at least 15’ upwind from grills and fireplaces.

  • Only use battery-operated lights in or near tents or campers.

Year-round Tips for Property Owners to Help Prevent Wildfires

  • Keep lawns trimmed, leaves raked.

  • Roof and rain gutters should be debris-free to prevent burning embers from a wildfire igniting your home.

  • Compost or chip vegetative debris piles.

  • Stack firewood at least 30’ away from structures.

  • Store flammable materials, liquids and solvents in metal containers outside the home, at least 30’ away from structures and wooden fences.

  • Make sure water sources, such as hydrants, ponds, swimming pools and wells are accessible for fire suppression.

  • Check the spark arresters on your combustible engines in equipment, such as lawn mowers, ATVs, dirt bikes and chainsaws.

  • Use fire resistant, protective roofing and materials like stone, brick and metal to protect your home.

  • Install multi-pane windows, tempered safety glass or fireproof shutters to protect large windows from radiant heat.

  • Have chimneys, wood stoves and all home heating systems inspected and cleaned annually by a certified specialist.

  • Remove branches hanging above and around chimneys.

  • Create at least a 10’ clearing around an incinerator before burning debris.

  • Have a fire extinguisher or garden hose on hand when burning debris.

 

Tips for Property Owners during Wildfire Season

  • If advised by Public Safety officials to evacuate, do so immediately.  Closely monitor the potential for Wildfires in your area through the Media.

  • When leaving, shut off gas at the meter and turn off pilot lights.

  • Open fireplace damper, closing the fireplace screen.

  • Close windows, vents, doors, blinds, or non-combustible window coverings and heavy drapes, removing flammable drapes and curtains.

  • Move flammable furniture into the center of the home, away from windows and sliding-glass doors.

  • Close all interior doors and windows to prevent drafts.

  • Place valuables that will not be damaged by water into a pool or pond.

  • Gather your pets into one room, making plans to care for your pets if you must evacuate.

  • Back your car into the garage or park it in an open space facing the direction of escape.  Shut doors and roll up windows.  Leave the keys in the ignition and the car doors unlocked.  Close garage windows and doors, but leave them unlocked.

  • Disconnect automatic garage door openers.

  • Place combustible patio/yard furniture indoors.

  • Connect garden hose to outside taps.  Place lawn sprinklers on the roof and near aboveground fuel tanks.  Wet your roof.

  • Wet or remove shrubs within 15’ of the house.

The

FLOWER POWER

MAGIC SHOW

with Debbie O’Carroll

will be at the

Southborough Library

 THURSDAY, JULY 22

 2:00 pm

All are welcome ~ No registration necessary

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Sports and Recreation
Outdoors Metrowest

Heat Blast

MEMA ADVISES CAUTION DURING EXTREMELY HOT WEATHER

 

FRAMINGHAM, MA – With the extremely hot weather the Commonwealth is presently experiencing, the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) is advising people to be cautious during this period of extreme heat, and is offering some tips to help keep cool and safe.

 

“A few common sense measures can reduce heat-related problems, especially for the elderly, the very young and people with respiratory ailments, who are more susceptible to the effects of high temperatures,” said MEMA Acting Director Kurt Schwartz. “As this extreme weather continues, some communities may be setting up cooling centers to assist those seeking relief from the oppressive heat.”

 

Here are some tips to follow during hot, humid weather:

·        Slow down, avoid strenuous activity.  Do not try to do too much on a hot day.

·        Wear lightweight, loose-fitting, light-colored clothing.  Light colors will reflect heat and sunlight and help maintain normal body temperature. Protect your face with a wide-brimmed hat.

·        Drink plenty of water regularly and often, even if you do not feel thirsty. Attempt to stay hydrated.

·        Limit intake of alcoholic beverages.  They can actually dehydrate your body.

·        Eat well-balanced, light, regular meals.  Avoid high protein foods that increase metabolic heat.

·        Stay indoors as much as possible. 

·        If you do not have air conditioning, stay on your lowest floor, out of the sun.  Electric fans do not cool the air, but they do help evaporate perspiration, which cools your body.

·        Go to a place where you can get relief from the heat, such as air conditioned schools, libraries, theaters and other community facilities that may offer refuge during the warmest times of the day.

·        Check with your community for information about possible local ‘cooling centers’.

 

·        Cover windows that receive morning or afternoon sun with drapes, shades, awnings or louvers.  Outdoor awnings or louvers can reduce the heat that enters a home by up to 80%.

·        Avoid too much sunshine.  Sunburn slows the skin’s ability to cool itself.  If you are outside, use sunscreen lotion with a high SPF (Sun Protection Factor) rating.

·        Never leave children or pets alone in a closed vehicle.

·        Check on family, friends and neighbors.

 

In normal weather, the body’s internal thermostat produces perspiration that evaporates and cools the body.  However, in extreme heat and high humidity, evaporation is slowed and the body must work extra hard to maintain normal temperature, which may lead to heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke.  If you believe you, or anyone you are with, is experiencing a heat-related medical emergency, promptly call 911, and if possible, move to a cooler place.

 

The Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) is the state agency responsible for coordinating federal, state, local, voluntary and private resources during emergencies and disasters in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.  MEMA provides leadership to: develop plans for effective response to all hazards, disasters or threats; train emergency personnel to protect the public; provide information to the citizenry; and assist individuals, families, businesses and communities to mitigate against, prepare for, and respond to and recover from emergencies, both natural and man made. For additional information about MEMA, go to www.mass.gov/mema. Continue to follow information from MEMA on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Heat advisory remains in effect from noon today to 7 pm edt this evening,
A heat advisory remains in effect from noon today to 7 pm edt this evening.
This heat advisory is for northern Connecticut, all of rhode island except for newport county and block island, central and eastern Massachusetts away from the coast, and the merrimack valley in southern New Hampshire.
Heat indices will reach 100 to 104 degrees for several hours this afternoon. Actual air temperatures will soar into the upper 90s with increasing humidity levels.
Prolonged outdoor work or exercise in these conditions can result in heat exhaustion or even heat stroke.
Precautionary/preparedness actions,
A heat advisory is issued when high humidities are expected to combine with hot temperatures resulting in heat indices of 100 degrees or greater. Avoid prolonged work in the sun or in poorly ventilated areas. Also, drink plenty of water and try to stay in an air conditioned environment.
 

Days of Old

July 6, 2010 - In earlier times, the Johnson farm would have been a bustling place with haying and cows at this time of the year.

southborough RECEIVES $3,839 GRANT FOR LOSS CONTROL AND SAFETY EFFORTS

View DetailsAs part of its commitment to safety and controlling costs, the town of Southborough has received a $3,839 grant that will be used to install a thermostat in the town house, library and senior center. In case of a temperature drop, the thermostat would trigger an alarm alerting staff before building freeze ups could occur, preventing significant damage. Another portion of the grant will be used to purchase software to track preventative maintenance activities and costs

The Loss Control Grant is from the Massachusetts Interlocal Insurance Association (MIIA), the municipality’s property and casualty insurance provider. MIIA Loss Control Grants are available to its member municipalities who may apply for funds upon recognizing a need in their community. Grants are awarded to fund equipment purchases and to implement training programs that address safety and loss prevention issues. These proactive efforts help avoid accidents and potentially costly claims to protect the municipality, its employees and its citizens.

The Massachusetts Interlocal Insurance Association (MIIA) is the non-profit insurance arm of the Massachusetts Municipal Association (MMA). As a member-based organization, MIIA’s only focus is to provide excellent service and quality risk management solutions to Massachusetts municipalities and related public entities. Municipal insurance its only business, MIIA insures nearly 400 cities, towns, and other public entities in Massachusetts. For more information please visit www.emiia.org  and www.mma.org

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT …

UV SAFETY MONTH                    

accessories,beaches,eyeglasses,eyewear,glasses,households,montages,mountains,summer,sun,sunglasses,sunny,travels,vacations,waterSkin cancer. Wrinkles. Premature aging. Now you can add cataracts and macular degeneration - eye conditions that can lead to blindness - to the list of dangers the sun can inflict.

Recent studies have shown that prolonged exposure to the sun's ultraviolet rays without protection may cause serious eye conditions that can lead to vision loss and blindness.

Because July is UV Safety Month, Eye M.D.s across the country are taking this opportunity to urge Americans to wear sunglasses and wide-brimmed hats whenever spending prolonged time in the sun.

Wear sunglasses that block 99 to 100 percent of UV-A and UV-B rays. Buying a good pair of sunglasses is not enough. You must remember to wear them whenever you’re outside. Don't be fooled by a cloudy day. The sun's rays can still burn through the haze and thin clouds.

And please, don't forget the kids. Children should also wear hats and sunglasses and try to stay out of the sun between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m., when the sun's ultraviolet rays are the strongest.

Have fun in the sun, but remember to protect your eyes!

EVANGELIDIS FINISHES STRONG JUNE

Raises over $33,000 this month

 

WORCESTER – Worcester County Sheriff candidate Lew Evangelidis recently highlighted an extremely successful month on the campaign trail.  Evangelidis reported over $33,000 in deposits during June as his fundraising momentum continues from the early months of his campaign. 

 

Evangelidis, a former assistant district attorney and assistant state prosecutor said, “Our campaign has quickly gained momentum and support throughout the entire county from folks who are fed up with patronage, wasteful spending and are ready to elect a Sheriff who is professional, independent and innovative.   Whether we are in Leominster, Southbridge or any of the communities we’ve visited, voters are very receptive to a candidate who is not part of the patronage plagued old Worcester County political machine.” 

 

Evangelidis continued, “We’ve held over 50 organized standouts in the month of June and put together a busy calendar with events throughout the entire county. The best part about this campaign is having a chance to make so many new friends throughout the county, as well as the chance to hear directly from the voters on how they want a Sheriff who will be a community partner beyond the four walls of the jail.”

 

To learn more about Evangelidis’ campaign for Sheriff, please visit his website at www.lewforsheriff.com

 

STATEMENT OF KARYN POLITO CALLING ON THE LEGISLATURE TO
SUSPEND SUMMER RECESS AND RETURN TO WORK ON BUDGET

"The state budget Governor Patrick signed into law yesterday is a ticking time bomb for the taxpayers of Massachusetts. It relies on too much borrowing and one-time gimmicks. It is almost completely lacking in any serious structural reform. These are critical times. For that reason, I am calling on House Speaker DeLeo and Senate President Murray to suspend legislative rules and hold formal sessions of the General Court throughout this summer dedicated solely to the budget. We need to evaluate every spending program in the budget. If a program is not working, it should be eliminated. If it is not a core service, it should be re-evaluated. The last thing we should do is to ignore the obvious problems in our budget and pretend that we've solved them."

Sports and Recreation
REI - Sports Framingham, MA

Family Climb

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Join us at REI's Climbing Pinnacle. Whether a veteran, beginner, or never experienced the thrill of indoor climbing, this event is for you!

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When: 07/08/2010 06:00 PM
Cost: $

Digital Camera Basics Class

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Find out everything you need to know about the basic functions of your digital camera from a professional photographer. We will cover exposure settings (automatic to manual mode), metering, auto focus, use of flash, file size and type, and playing back images.

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When: 07/08/2010 06:30 PM
Cost: $

Framingham Summer Concert Series

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Join REI and the Town of Framingham on Friday nights in July for this FREE concert series at Framingham Village Green at Edgell Road and Vernon Street.

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When: 07/09/2010 06:30 PM
Cost: Free

For more outdoor events sponsored by REI click here

Worcester Chapter of AMC

Deerfield River Class 1

Date: 07/10/2010

Paddle beautiful Deerfield River, Class 1 section. Early afternoon put-in. Dinner option at Shelbourne Falls after the paddle. Bring bathing suits for swimming.

Activity Category: Paddling, Paddling
Location: Charlemont
Region: Massachusetts, Pioneer Valley
State: MA
Country: USA
Status: Open
Leader: David Cole  508-869-3125  508-869-3125 (before 9:00pm)
Co-Leader: Russ Hammond , Elaine Cibelli
Registrar: David Cole  508-869-3125  508-869-3125 (before 9:00pm)


Tuesday Night Ride

Date: 07/13/2010

Meet at Hot Dog Annie's on Route 56 in Leicester. Just north of Becker College.

Activity Category: Bicycling, Bicycling
Region: Massachusetts, Central
State: MA
Country: USA
Status: Open
Leader: Steve Trimby  508 892-9526  508 892-9526

Nature's Fireworks

July 5, 2010 - Nature brought on it's own colorful "fireworks" last night with a brilliant sunset.

I put this photo here because it looked like a hot summer day and didn't think it would need much info. I've gotten a few emails asking where it was taken from.  It was from the route 85 causeway headed south about 7:00 P.M. on July 4th. It was just a quick shot out the passenger side window.  Coming past the cemetery I didn't know that the sky and water would look like this but I usually have my camera ready for anything. Good thing I wasn't driving. I'd have had to pull over on the causeway for this shot.

Heat Advisory

URGENT - WEATHER MESSAGE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TAUNTON MA
353 PM EDT MON JUL 5 2010

...DANGEROUS HEAT INDICES EXPECTED ON TUESDAY...

CTZ002>004-MAZ005-010>014-017-018-026-NHZ012-RIZ001>005-060400-
/O.NEW.KBOX.HT.Y.0002.100706T1600Z-100706T2300Z/
HARTFORD CT-TOLLAND CT-WINDHAM CT-CENTRAL MIDDLESEX MA-
EASTERN HAMPSHIRE MA-EASTERN HAMPDEN MA-SOUTHERN WORCESTER MA-
WESTERN NORFOLK MA-SOUTHEAST MIDDLESEX MA-NORTHERN BRISTOL MA-
WESTERN PLYMOUTH MA-NORTHERN MIDDLESEX MA-EASTERN HILLSBOROUGH NH-
NORTHWEST PROVIDENCE RI-SOUTHEAST PROVIDENCE RI-WESTERN KENT RI-
EASTERN KENT RI-BRISTOL RI-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...HARTFORD...WINDSOR LOCKS...UNION...
VERNON...PUTNAM...WILLIMANTIC...FRAMINGHAM...LOWELL...AMHERST...
NORTHAMPTON...SPRINGFIELD...MILFORD...WORCESTER...FOXBORO...
NORWOOD...CAMBRIDGE...TAUNTON...BROCKTON...AYER...MANCHESTER...
NASHUA...FOSTER...SMITHFIELD...PROVIDENCE...WEST GREENWICH...
WARWICK...BRISTOL
353 PM EDT MON JUL 5 2010

...HEAT ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM NOON TO 7 PM EDT TUESDAY...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN TAUNTON HAS ISSUED A HEAT
ADVISORY...WHICH IS IN EFFECT FROM NOON TO 7 PM EDT TUESDAY.

THIS HEAT ADVISORY IS FOR NORTHERN CONNECTICUT...MOST OF RHODE
ISLAND EXCEPT FOR THE SOUTH COAST...CENTRAL AND EASTERN
MASSACHUSETTS AWAY FROM THE COAST...AND THE MERRIMACK VALLEY IN
SOUTHERN NEW HAMPSHIRE.

HEAT ADVISORIES WILL REACH 100 TO 104 DEGREES FOR SEVERAL HOURS
TUESDAY AFTERNOON. ACTUAL AIR TEMPERATURES WILL SOAR INTO THE
UPPER 90S WITH INCREASING HUMIDITY LEVELS.

PROLONGED OUTDOOR WORK OR EXERCISE IN THESE CONDITIONS CAN RESULT
IN HEAT EXHAUSTION OR EVEN HEAT STROKE.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A HEAT ADVISORY IS ISSUED WHEN HIGH HUMIDITIES ARE EXPECTED TO
COMBINE WITH HOT TEMPERATURES RESULTING IN HEAT INDICES OF
100 DEGREES OR GREATER. AVOID PROLONGED WORK IN THE SUN OR IN
POORLY VENTILATED AREAS.  ALSO...DRINK PLENTY OF WATER AND TRY TO
STAY IN AN AIR CONDITIONED ENVIRONMENT.

Sunday  4

Monday  5

Tuesday 6

Wednesday 7

Thursday8

Friday 9

Saturday 10

closed

closed

 

Pajama Story Time
Jul 07   7:00 PM  

 

 

 

The Library has a great new website:  Click here

Senior Center Activities

5 Monday  6Tuesday 7 Wednesday 8Thursday 9Friday 10 Saturday
Closed Holiday   8:30 am health clinic 9:30 Mah Jongg
 
9:00 AM center opens
 
8:30 am Walking Group
 
 
9:30 am Tai Chi
 
  10:00 AM Bocce 10 am Bocce  
 
12 Ping Pong
 
12:00 PM Pitch 10:00 AM canasta
  12:00 Pitch 2:00 Fitness 1:00 PM Bridge  
    4:00 Summer BBQ    

Click here for the new Senior Center Website

Support Our Senior Centers:

Stop on in and get your "Senior Centers Bumper Sticker"

Computers:  We now have two computers in the hall before you enter our main room that are now hooked up to the internet. You will be able to read e-mail and look up information as well as play some fun card games. Feel free to sit down and use the computers. Let us know if you would like any help.

Southborough meetings

July 6 - July 9, 2010

Meeting

Date

Time

Where

Zoning Board of Appeals

7/7

7:00 PM

Upper Hall Cordaville Hall

Sparkles the Fire Safety Dog is excited to share the cover for her new children's fire safety book, Sparkles Goes to Boston! The book will be released October 16th in Southborough, MA. The book features Sparkles the Fire Safety Dog, Firefighter Dayna, Lt. Jim Peltier and all of his friends at the Southborough Fire Department.
For More information click here